Dually any good in the snow/ice - Page 2 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gear ideas for urban homeless pcheck Urban Survival 35 03-06-2017 01:13 AM
AK Magazines - Which Are Good or Junk powderandprimers Military Weapons Forum 60 12-20-2016 07:51 PM
Old CB Radio, Still Good? Shelfactor Communications 6 12-05-2016 05:33 PM
A good read on the media David T. General Discussion 1 10-12-2016 03:29 PM
GOOD solar distillery? kotterr DIY - Do It Yourself 0 10-09-2016 05:45 AM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-18-2017, 07:16 PM
browningv308 browningv308 is online now
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 436
Thanks: 35
Thanked 366 Times in 163 Posts
Default



Advertise Here

My reason for wanting a dually this time around is a dually is cheaper than a single rear wheel truck- I want a 3/4 ton, 4x4. My truck Iv'e owned for 20 years is a 95 3/4 ton 4x4 454 GMC it has an extended cab and longbed and it has all the options that were available back then. Been a good truck I never really have had any problems with it in 20 years and 250k
Just comparing 2-3 year old used GM trucks it seems like a dually is cheaper than a single rear wheel. And because I hear negative stuff about the 8.1 I want a diesel this time around. I really don't pull much but want the power if I need it.
I own a fleet of vans so buying tires is a normal thing for me and I can write off the cost of tires.
And lastly Iv'e been driving a big block truck truck for 20 years at 6mpg, so if the diesel even gets 2 mpg better than that's money in the bank for me.
Old 01-18-2017, 08:29 PM
MillenniumWright MillenniumWright is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 6
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Default 96 Cummins dually

I've been running my Cummins dually around for 6 or 8 years. Here's what I've learned: For off road situations a dually has one serious but workable drawback and that is the tire size limitations. The rims are typically 6" wide on all six so that the two rears don't end up being 3' of rubber side to side. There are gawdawful few options for wider rims. YOU CANNOT PUT WIDE TIRES ON THE REAR without using rim spacers. If you reduce the sidewall clearance between each rear pair and then load the truck down the sidewalks will rub and you will have blowouts. In order to get around this, some of us have put spacers in between each pair of rear wheels, now we have more sidewall clearance and can run a little wider tire. I run 10-ply 285/75 16's, and they work well for me. The bfg's were garbage on my truck, ****ty traction wet or dry and they melted away in 12k miles. I ran nitro terra grapplers for several years and if you keep your alignment in check and rotate once in a while you can get 40k out of them. They were good all around but not super aggressive for off-road conditions. Running them on narrower rims than they call for causes them to crown and wear in the center first, and some tire shops won't do it.

If you go the spacer route you need to get STEEL from a quality manufacturer. Mine were about 275 if I recall right. Pretty sure mine were made in USA, I talk d to the guy and he was a small time kind of operation with a quality product. The dodge or 4x4 forums are helpful in finding the right place.

Right now I have a set of kumho a/t's I just put on and I absolutely love the wet traction. Theyve only been out about a year and they were 1200 at tirebuyer website (can find them on eBay) instead of the 1500-1600 the nittos cost. I suspect snow and mud will also be very good with these tires. As far as how long they will last I don't know, so far they look like they're not wearing much.

The stock tire sizes wear faster unless you get highway tires, but if you do that just forget about actual deep sand or snow. You're staying on gravel and dodging the deep puddles on dirt roads.

A diesel dually has a lot of weight up front, and having only 285's is a drawback. At the same time, I have driven my truck all over the dunes in wet and dry fluffy sand, most important thing is to air down to about 20psi all around. In real loose stuff some guys will go to 15psi. Snow traction is the same, depending on conditions you should air down to between 15 and 45 psi. 500lbs in the bed helps rather than hurts. I haven't done much ice, so no opinion on that except chains on.

My 96 12 valve Cummins runs through a 5 speed manual trans. It's tuned up a little. If I stay below 70 mph and drive conservatively I get 16mpg. If I drive faster than 70 and get on the throttle a lot I drop to 14.5 or so. In streamers cas S I might see 12's, and when towing a big car hauler I might see 11. I know a guy with twin compound turbos running an auto trans getting 22mpg, maybe 500hp and 1000lb/ft of torque. The key to higher mpg is higher boost.
Old 01-18-2017, 09:16 PM
Backwoods Alaskan's Avatar
Backwoods Alaskan Backwoods Alaskan is offline
Last Frontiersman
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,788
Thanks: 403
Thanked 3,636 Times in 1,124 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by browningv308 View Post
My reason for wanting a dually this time around is a dually is cheaper than a single rear wheel truck- I want a 3/4 ton, 4x4. My truck Iv'e owned for 20 years is a 95 3/4 ton 4x4 454 GMC it has an extended cab and longbed and it has all the options that were available back then. Been a good truck I never really have had any problems with it in 20 years and 250k
Just comparing 2-3 year old used GM trucks it seems like a dually is cheaper than a single rear wheel. And because I hear negative stuff about the 8.1 I want a diesel this time around. I really don't pull much but want the power if I need it.
I own a fleet of vans so buying tires is a normal thing for me and I can write off the cost of tires.
And lastly Iv'e been driving a big block truck truck for 20 years at 6mpg, so if the diesel even gets 2 mpg better than that's money in the bank for me.
Nobody makes a 3/4 ton truck with a dual rear wheel axle.
 
Old 01-18-2017, 10:05 PM
Cboggs2's Avatar
Cboggs2 Cboggs2 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Linden, Michigan
Posts: 68
Thanks: 22
Thanked 44 Times in 31 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rt66paul View Post
A diesel engine is not as pipey as a gasoline engine. They work best when in the sewwt spot rpm they are designed for. Unless you have tweaked your diesel to be a race truck or the like, it should run steady and not spin the tires like a gasoline engine can.
That would depend on which engine and trans you have. For example my GMC truck has a 6.5 turbo and it would do exactly what you say. It is not fast off the line but it does ok with the loads I haul.

A Duramax with an allison trans. is very quick off the line. I used to be the "Product Specialist" on the Duramax Diesel power tour (See pic of our rig below). People would come into our display and question how the Duramax was supposed to out pull the Powerstroke and cummins engines (This was in 2000 before anyone else had one except us) and I would explain to them that the first gear in the Allison trans was a granny gear which would not only get the truck out of the hole faster but it would get the turbo spooled up sooner so when it hit second gear (Ford and Dodge's first gear) it was at full spool and pouring on the power. Even though The Powerstroke had more HP on paper, the Duramax was able to apply the power to the road better and thus it would out pull them hauling the same load in a one mile uphill pull.

Of course all three trucks have more power and 5/6 speed transmissions now.

Here is a pic of our rig (Duramax pulling a 50' trailer).

https://scontent-ort2-1.xx.fbcdn.net...08&oe=59197F61
Old 01-18-2017, 10:11 PM
Cboggs2's Avatar
Cboggs2 Cboggs2 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Linden, Michigan
Posts: 68
Thanks: 22
Thanked 44 Times in 31 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Backwoods Alaskan View Post
Nobody makes a 3/4 ton truck with a dual rear wheel axle.
I did, LOL... I put a set of dual wheels on a 78 Chevy 3/4 4x4 years ago.
Old 01-18-2017, 11:21 PM
Backwoods Alaskan's Avatar
Backwoods Alaskan Backwoods Alaskan is offline
Last Frontiersman
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,788
Thanks: 403
Thanked 3,636 Times in 1,124 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cboggs2 View Post
I did, LOL... I put a set of dual wheels on a 78 Chevy 3/4 4x4 years ago.
So have I. You also aren't a truck manufacturer. The OP was talking about buying one, not building one.
Old 01-19-2017, 04:25 AM
browningv308 browningv308 is online now
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 436
Thanks: 35
Thanked 366 Times in 163 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Backwoods Alaskan View Post
So have I. You also aren't a truck manufacturer. The OP was talking about buying one, not building one.
No I'm not trying to buy a 3/4 ton dually, I'm looking for a 3500.
Nobody makes a 3/4 ton dually
Old 01-19-2017, 05:24 AM
JDH's Avatar
JDH JDH is online now
Si vis pacem, para bellum
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 5,081
Thanks: 405
Thanked 7,687 Times in 2,964 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cboggs2 View Post
That would depend on which engine and trans you have. For example my GMC truck has a 6.5 turbo and it would do exactly what you say. It is not fast off the line but it does ok with the loads I haul.

A Duramax with an allison trans. is very quick off the line. I used to be the "Product Specialist" on the Duramax Diesel power tour (See pic of our rig below). People would come into our display and question how the Duramax was supposed to out pull the Powerstroke and cummins engines (This was in 2000 before anyone else had one except us) and I would explain to them that the first gear in the Allison trans was a granny gear which would not only get the truck out of the hole faster but it would get the turbo spooled up sooner so when it hit second gear (Ford and Dodge's first gear) it was at full spool and pouring on the power. Even though The Powerstroke had more HP on paper, the Duramax was able to apply the power to the road better and thus it would out pull them hauling the same load in a one mile uphill pull.

Of course all three trucks have more power and 5/6 speed transmissions now.

Here is a pic of our rig (Duramax pulling a 50' trailer).

https://scontent-ort2-1.xx.fbcdn.net...08&oe=59197F61


MY 15 Ram Cummins is better off the line than was my 13 Duramax. Tow rating is higher also. The I6 is definitely more torquey than the V8.

The biggest surprise was that the "Dodge" built quality has improved greatly, equal to the GM trucks.
Old 01-19-2017, 10:23 AM
TacticalFarmer TacticalFarmer is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 790
Thanks: 1,017
Thanked 991 Times in 396 Posts
Default

I've driven a chevy 3500 dually in the snow before. It was a rear-wheel-drive only. It had a V plow on the front and was used as a plow truck.

Tire chains are a must have, in my opinion. That applies to all trucks, but especially duallies.
Old 01-19-2017, 10:26 AM
TacticalFarmer TacticalFarmer is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 790
Thanks: 1,017
Thanked 991 Times in 396 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JDH View Post
MY 15 Ram Cummins is better off the line than was my 13 Duramax. Tow rating is higher also. The I6 is definitely more torquey than the V8.

The biggest surprise was that the "Dodge" built quality has improved greatly, equal to the GM trucks.
You won't know if that truck is quality for 15 more years. All vehicles are quality when they're only 3 years old!
Old 01-19-2017, 10:58 AM
America's Patriot's Avatar
America's Patriot America's Patriot is offline
LEGAL citizen
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 10,201
Thanks: 1,384
Thanked 19,550 Times in 6,450 Posts
Default

The only added benefits are more contact patch on the ground and the additional weight. However, the cost is far more than a standard...
Old 01-19-2017, 12:36 PM
JDH's Avatar
JDH JDH is online now
Si vis pacem, para bellum
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 5,081
Thanks: 405
Thanked 7,687 Times in 2,964 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TacticalFarmer View Post
You won't know if that truck is quality for 15 more years. All vehicles are quality when they're only 3 years old!
There are things you can see right away. Panel gap alignment, lack of rattles, paint, my boots haven't worn through the carpet/floor mat under the pedals, the mirror hasn't fallen off, visor don't fall down with every little bump in the road to name a few.

Get back to me in 12 more years. I'll probably still have it barring what the insurance company refers to as "an act of god" in my policy.
Old 01-19-2017, 02:45 PM
Michael4yah's Avatar
Michael4yah Michael4yah is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: North Orange County Ca.
Posts: 94
Thanks: 9
Thanked 96 Times in 50 Posts
Default

Ive had 4X4 dually's since 1980. All Chevys. Make sure you have positraction. Make sure you have aggressive tires on all 6 wheels. When you're empty the rear tires dont have enough weight on them in snow. As long as you have about 3-400 lbs in the bed it should be ok. YOU cannot beat these trucks for hauling a bunch of stuff in a hurry in bad weather. Nothing else comes close unless you start talking 650s etc.
The Following User Says Thank You to Michael4yah For This Useful Post:
Old 01-19-2017, 05:17 PM
Cboggs2's Avatar
Cboggs2 Cboggs2 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Linden, Michigan
Posts: 68
Thanks: 22
Thanked 44 Times in 31 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JDH View Post
MY 15 Ram Cummins is better off the line than was my 13 Duramax. Tow rating is higher also. The I6 is definitely more torquey than the V8.

The biggest surprise was that the "Dodge" built quality has improved greatly, equal to the GM trucks.
I wasn't comparing trucks necessarily, I was explaining that a diesel engine alone doesn't make them get better traction, gearing makes a big difference. The I6 has a lot of torque because it has a longer stroke.

I was also talking about 2001 trucks. All three have stepped up their game since then.
Old 01-19-2017, 05:46 PM
IdahoNative IdahoNative is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: North central Idaho since '97.
Posts: 31
Thanks: 40
Thanked 45 Times in 21 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TacticalFarmer View Post
Tire chains are a must have, in my opinion. That applies to all trucks, but especially duallies.
My duallie is a four-wheel drive. Unfortunately, all four are on the back. For the uninitiated, I'm about to save you some grief. Knowledge I gained, some years back, the hard way.

You are probably going to want a pair of three-rail chain sets for the back. Putting single-tire chains on the outsides sounds like a good idea. And, might be fine on nothing but ice. However, as soon as you spin a little bit, if you're on snow pack, the chains are going to dig down looking for traction. This places the inside set on the slick stuff. Now, you are sitting there spinning on the insides while the chains on the outsides are flailing around in a hole of their own making.

It's a regular epiphany is what it is.
Old 01-19-2017, 06:43 PM
NHCraigT's Avatar
NHCraigT NHCraigT is online now
Prepared in NH
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Backwoods of NH
Age: 50
Posts: 12,667
Thanks: 2,560
Thanked 5,049 Times in 3,221 Posts
Default

As already mentioned, duallies shine when it comes to heavy towing. They out class all single rear wheel trucks in weight load tow ratings.

The above being said, I have a single rear wheel turbo diesel 3500 (1 ton).
its a great truck for towing and snow plowing. The extended cab and 8' bed give it a long and stable wheelbase.

HOWEVER, what gets the truck moving like a tank in snow and ice is = the 4 wheel drive with 4 studded tires.

I Went to 4 studded tires 2 years ago and wondered why I hadn't earlier. No need for ballast.

I have a set on factory alloy rims, and switch them out to normal treaded tires on factory rims in the early spring.

Best investment IMHO, if you live in snow country.

After sliding down the end of the driveway in her SUV, my wife is switching to studded tires for next winter.
Old 01-21-2017, 04:17 PM
hunterbob's Avatar
hunterbob hunterbob is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Texas
Posts: 155
Thanks: 408
Thanked 131 Times in 66 Posts
Default

In heavy snow and ice use chains on rear
Old 01-21-2017, 04:18 PM
hunterbob's Avatar
hunterbob hunterbob is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Texas
Posts: 155
Thanks: 408
Thanked 131 Times in 66 Posts
Default

Mine is not a dually, and I got semi aggressive tires ,,, no problem anywhere I go,,, but you have to use your brain
Old 01-24-2017, 08:38 PM
notnormal notnormal is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Amarillo, TX
Posts: 34
Thanks: 2
Thanked 38 Times in 16 Posts
Default

My old rear wheel drive ford dually would get stuck if you just talked about snow and would hydroplane on new tires if someone spit in the street. That was running empty with no weight in the bed. With a few hundred pounds in the bed it did rain well. With the same added weight and the snow chains that wrapped over both tires I was invincible! You can make most anything work if you work with it
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to notnormal For This Useful Post:
Old 02-02-2017, 08:05 PM
mudmaker mudmaker is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 120
Thanks: 46
Thanked 81 Times in 48 Posts
Default

I had a 99 F350 dually when I was hauling a lot of weight, but gladly went back to a srw when I quit hot shotting. The duallies are crap in mud and ice simply due to the lbs per square inch on the road. Same difference when you put wide tires on vs narrow. I had to chain up my dually many more times than my srw when hunting and such in both snow and mud. If you need the stability for towing then it is worth the extra tires, but that is the only reason IMHO.

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to mudmaker For This Useful Post:
Reply

Bookmarks



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net