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Old 01-17-2017, 09:40 PM
browningv308 browningv308 is offline
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Default Dually any good in the snow/ice



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It's about time to start looking for my next truck. Been thinking about going with a diesel dually 4x4
Anyone here have a dually How is it in the snow and ice?
Old 01-17-2017, 10:59 PM
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Duallies are fine in the snow and ice, as long as you have good aggressive tires and four wheel drive. I drive one, my father drives one, friends drive them. They're fine.
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Old 01-17-2017, 11:03 PM
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You pulling anything important regularly
 
Old 01-17-2017, 11:09 PM
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You pulling anything important regularly
Is this directed at me?
Old 01-17-2017, 11:32 PM
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Duals are good for flotation on soft ground. Some of our local farmers have 'em for that reason. Especially those who pull gooseneck stock trailers a lot. They are necessary if the truck has to carry more weight than two tires can handle. Otherwise a waste of money.

Unless your ego needs 'em. I get a laugh outta the gas workers around here driving $70,000 pickups with duals, chrome out to here, and perfect paint jobs. They go from their hotels to a hard surface parking lot every day, and to bars down by the river. Never off road, never a chip or a scratch in the beds. They beat the **** out of the company trucks, but never their own.
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Old 01-18-2017, 12:16 AM
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It's not always about ego. It's no different than the person who chooses to drive a Bentley over a Subaru. Different tastes. It may be a waste of money to some, but not to others. Different people have different priorities.

Lots of people with duallies aren't pushing them to the limit every day. Many could get by with an F250, but plan to upgrade trailers or RVs or tractors or whatever someday and want to "grow in to" the truck so they don't have to upgrade it too.
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Old 01-18-2017, 12:42 AM
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I've always heard that dually were bad in snow and mud as the outside tire has to cut it's own path, instead of following in the tracks of the front tires.

In Iraq - seemed like every dually I saw had damage on their rear fenders as most folks are used to the extra width and frequently hit stuff (T-Walls & Jersey Barriers) with them.
Old 01-18-2017, 12:48 AM
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Snow.. FOUR WHEEL DRIVE >PERIOD!..With a little weight in the bed you should be fine. Dually's have many purposes and are great vehicles.. most of the above post are spot on.
Old 01-18-2017, 12:52 AM
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Originally Posted by drobs View Post
I've always heard that dually were bad in snow and mud as the outside tire has to cut it's own path, instead of following in the tracks of the front tires.

In Iraq - seemed like every dually I saw had damage on their rear fenders as most folks are used to the extra width and frequently hit stuff (T-Walls & Jersey Barriers) with them.
Why would the outer rears having to make their own path cause problems? The front tires do the same thing. And the rears are also the drive wheels, which has the added benefit of power turning them.

The reason duallies aren't as good as SRW trucks in the snow is because of the added flotation. If you consider overall weight of the vehicle to be equal, each rear tire on a dually has half as much pressure on it as a SRW truck does. As a result, it has a tendency to "float" over the ground instead of pushing through it to reach a solid surface. But, even that isn't an issue if you're properly set up.
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Old 01-18-2017, 12:54 AM
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Originally Posted by 5keepers View Post
Snow.. FOUR WHEEL DRIVE >PERIOD
Ahh... No. I don't know where "Cocos Islands" are but I'm guessing they don't get snow. Unless you're offroad, most of the time you are fine in 2wd, even in snowy conditions.
Old 01-18-2017, 03:22 AM
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I don't haul cattle or tow a 5th wheel so I can't justify a diesel or a dually for what I use a vehicle for. Seems to me to get the best traction out of a dually you need lots of weight in the bed, more so than a single rear wheel.

Quoting a couple places:

More weight required:

"To get decent traction with the duals (especially 2WD),you will need a lot of weight.Remember the ground pressure at the contact patch is spread across four wheels instead of two,so you need to increase the weight to achieve the same ground pressure."

http://www.snowplowforums.com/forums...ear-wheel.html

Slip more when driving on snow covered rutted roads:

"I drive a dually all day every day at work. Getting around in snow is not much of a problem over my pickup with singles. The HUGE difference is when things started getting rutted whether it be ice ruts on the asphalt, or driving in 8" of fresh snow that has not been plowed but there is a well worn 2 track going through it. The duals do not want to sit in the 2 (lane) track that the other singles have left and and your rear end is constantly swinging back and forth. Very scarey if you are trying to drive too fast or have any distance to travel. Alot of folks around here will actually run singles on their duallies in the winter for this reason. (or they are too cheap to buy the extra 2 studs) They look goofy set up that way. but are much safer on our roads. The duallies are great rigs, safe rigs when hauling heavy loads. Just not for everyone and get real squirrely in any thing rutted."

http://www.snowest.com/forum/archive.../t-117438.html

On my second GMC Xtended cab 4X long box in ten years. Great for putting the 11.5 ft. camper on or the deck and sleds then loading to the nuts but it does suffer in the snow for sure. I never get up the road as high as a single rear wheel 4X4 no matter what tires are on it. When the highway is slush you can feel the rear wheels sliding around compared to a SRW truck. With new tire technology you can load a SRW 1 ton with almost as much weight as a dually. Won't be buying another one.

http://www.snowest.com/forum/archive.../t-117438.html
Old 01-18-2017, 04:17 PM
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Sure like my dually. I keep my 5th wheel hitch in the bed year round, pulling the 5er in the summer and extra weight in the winter. Gets around good in the ice and snow.
3.73 gears, 4x4, limited slip rear end, BFGoodrich AT tires. Plenty of ground clearance.
Great Cummins motor too. 20 mpg running empty on the highway, 14 mpg with our Jayco Eagle 339. I would do it all again.
Old 01-18-2017, 04:47 PM
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Define "Good".

Mine was OK with good off road tires and around 600lb in the bed. But empty it could be a handful, And on a washboard dirt road it would try to walk off into the ditch.
Old 01-18-2017, 04:49 PM
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I've had both rear wheel drive only and 4-wheel drive duallies and I live in Michigan so I got plenty of experience with them in the snow and ice.

My experience is that if you have good tires they pretty much drive the same as their single wheel counterparts. You will occasionally find a situation where the dual wheels will hinder but then their are times when they are a help as well.

If you are hauling a camper or a trailer, the dually will be more stable and hold the road better in windy conditions.

I run trailer mirrors and if my mirrors clear, the dually fender will too except on a curve or turn but I have never smashed one on my trucks.

The only real drawback is when you need to buy new tires.
Old 01-18-2017, 04:49 PM
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Large Marge and crew use a Cab-Over medium duty. Rear-wheel drive dually. With the air-locker axle, we go anyplace... and back.

Around Baja, we constantly see traveling Europeans (and L.A.-wannabes) with big 4x4 and military motorhome conversions... but they never leave a gravel road. If they get the thing stuck, they need the military to haul them out.

Over several decades, the only time we used 4x4 was in a 1991 Dodge Cummins in the 2007 blizzard around Mount Shasta. White-out, freeway closed, nine of ten vehicles in the ditch. Cummins came through.
Old 01-18-2017, 04:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Badmoose View Post
Define "Good".

Mine was OK with good off road tires and around 600lb in the bed. But empty it could be a handful, And on a washboard dirt road it would try to walk off into the ditch.
This is more likely due to the 1 ton springs than the dual rear wheels.
Old 01-18-2017, 04:56 PM
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[QUOTE=Over several decades, the only time we used 4x4 was in a 1991 Dodge Cummins in the 2007 blizzard around Mount Shasta. White-out, freeway closed, nine of ten vehicles in the ditch. Cummins came through.[/QUOTE]

Are you suggesting that the engine made it go better in the snow?

The only way I see that making a difference is due to the extra weight on the front axle if its of a 4X4.
Old 01-18-2017, 05:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cboggs2 View Post
This is more likely due to the 1 ton springs than the dual rear wheels.
Yep a '93 4x4 1 ton, Dodge Cummins 5-Speed, my '95 Ford F350 4x4, was single rear wheel, and wasn't anything like the dually
Old 01-18-2017, 06:37 PM
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A diesel engine is not as pipey as a gasoline engine. They work best when in the sewwt spot rpm they are designed for. Unless you have tweaked your diesel to be a race truck or the like, it should run steady and not spin the tires like a gasoline engine can.
Old 01-18-2017, 07:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rt66paul View Post
A diesel engine is not as pipey as a gasoline engine. They work best when in the sewwt spot rpm they are designed for. Unless you have tweaked your diesel to be a race truck or the like, it should run steady and not spin the tires like a gasoline engine can.
Not as pipey? Do you mean not as peppy? If so, you couldn't be more wrong.

One of the main attractions to diesel engines is their high torque at low RPM. Any modern diesel truck, stock, will beat their gasoline counterpart off the line.

Diesel engines also have a much broader torque curve than gasoline engines do, which means they pull harder through a wider RPM range. Gasoline engines build torque slow, then hit it hard, then drop off quickly. Diesels have heavy torque early, and hold it high in to the RPM range.
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