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Old 02-16-2017, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Metcalf View Post
I've tried just about every bead retention trick in the book over the years. The best bang for the buck ended up being two to three wraps of good quality gorilla tape over the safety bead but only half way across the bead flat. That seems to be fairly good down to about 3psi. It increases the diameter of the safety bead and rim slightly. The tire generally tries to peel the tape off in shear. With good tape that takes a decent amount of force.
really amazing in the low single digits....
You haven't tried this: Castor Oil. During my racing days in the '70s an old-timer showed me this trick. When installing the tire, lubricate the bead with castor oil, (we used Castrol R). The rubber will soften just enough to conform to the surface finish of the bead seat, then solidify again. Just forget that it was me who told you this when it comes time to get the tire off.
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Old 02-17-2017, 12:27 AM
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Originally Posted by thegoat View Post
Ive broken and chipped a lot of alloy wheels in my days on the track.

I would go forged billet (or just billet) steel wheels (either solid or the hole pattern, not spokes) with a composite run flat tire inserts. Though this will be heavy and ultimately sacrifice some 0-60 and handling, it will ensure you get to where you are going.

The inserts run around $600-800 set.


You can get the same technology in the military version of the H1 hummer rims. The early versions had a magnesium insert. The later version had a rubber insert. The wheel is a two piece design. They are a 16.5 size wheel so the tire selection is a little limited.

The biggest issue with them is that at reduced tire pressures ( for traction ) the run flat insert can start to contact the tire. That contact wears on the tire eventually causing a tire failure. A lot of people ended up cutting the run flat portion off and keeping just enough for bead retention. There are still companies providing replacement inserts without the run flat out of different materials.

You can still find the H1 versions of the wheels in the surplus market for good prices. Generally you have to cut out and replace the center to make them have a usable amount of backspacing

Hutchinson also makes a similar aftermarket wheel with a rubber insert, but no run-flat rub. It is their 'Rock Monster' line of wheels.
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Old 02-19-2017, 11:04 PM
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I have had problems with alloy wheels losing air.

Never had that with steel wheels.
 
Old 02-20-2017, 12:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Mule Skinner View Post
I have had problems with alloy wheels losing air.

Never had that with steel wheels.
Ive broken spokes, bent the lips and cracked the rim straight though on alloys. All lost air quickly. Steel survived a lot longer, but that castor oil trick Im going to have to try.

Old coach - its castor oil (like my mom gave me when i swore), not castrol oil, like engine fluids right?
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Old 02-20-2017, 01:28 AM
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Originally Posted by thegoat View Post
Ive broken spokes, bent the lips and cracked the rim straight though on alloys. All lost air quickly. Steel survived a lot longer, but that castor oil trick Im going to have to try.

Old coach - its castor oil (like my mom gave me when i swore), not castrol oil, like engine fluids right?
Yes, it's casTOR oil. Extracted from beans. The Castrol name came from the far distant past when rotary aircraft engines were lubed with casTOR oil mixed with the gas, like a common two-stroke chainsaw engine. For an interesting look at what is today a strange engine design, look up Rotary Engine on Wikipedia. One Sir Charles Wakefield's company was the first large commercial supplier in England, and he eventually renamed his company Castrol.

Until synthetics came along, we motorcycle racers used the same mix. Castrol had a Type R oil that was the most common bean oil used in my day. It looks from a quick search that Castrol may not sell it anymore, except in Australia, so you may have to fall back on drugstore oil. EDIT: http://www.klotzlube.com/radio_control_.html BeNOL is what you want. All their other oils are blended synthetics.

WW1 pilots who flew behind those oil-spewing rotary engines tended to ingest some of it, with the usual effects on the lower G.I. tract. Legend has it that they drank large amounts of blackberry brandy as an antidote.

p.s. if you DO find some castor bean engine oil, a bit mixed into your two-stroke engine fuel makes a most delicious smell, but don't let it stand around. Bean oil degrades very quickly in gasoline. "Use no mixed oil over 8 hours old" was our rule. Also never ever mix bean oil with petroleum oil. It will congeal into a gloppy mess that will clog oil lines and oil pumps. I don't know how many guys racing vintage motorcycles with me in the 1980s learned this to their intense sorrow.
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Old 02-20-2017, 02:07 PM
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I went right onto a big hole trying to avoid a stray dog. Bent the steel rim and started to lose air. In 30 seconds, I was in the front of a nearby tire repair shop (freaking lucky btad, I know) and a guy with a hammer "fixed" my rim, proof with some soap water meanwhile adding air, and that´s it. Minutes after I was down the road like never that happened...
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