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Old 01-11-2017, 01:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Justme11 View Post
What are "spare underwear photographs"?

I mean, nobody appreciates a good pair of underwear more than me, but why would I want photos of them?

Unless to send to that fine publication "Modern Skidmark". But seems like that could wait until after the trek.
For the OP, it's just a difficult list to really read as it's not organized or include punctuation (which is why you get "underwear photographs"

No issues really with the items, but it helps if they're categorized when listed and listed vertically as opposed to a run-on sentence. The traditional "essentials" is always a good starting point and then add in those specific to your own needs or requirements...here's mine:

My The 10 Essentials

1. Appropriate Clothing
2. Shelter
3. Water
4. Fire
5. Knife/Tool
6. First Aid/Skin Protection
7. Navigation
8. Signal/Illumination
9. Calories
10. Security/Situational Awareness

These are all the basis for any Bug-out/Bug-home or bug-somewhere Bag. I've found categorization an effective tool to really reduce unnecessary redundancy and weight. Some items are "mission specific" or environment/location/climate specific as well. Oftentimes, people just have their own preferences based on their personal experiences.

It's mostly semantics, but it helps others here who read these posts to either comment, inquire, plagiarize (use) or create a dialogue to discuss with the hive.

Grammar and structure may seem like an insipid effort, but trust me, they make your point-of-topic and the conversation here with others much more effective and beneficial.

ROCK6
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Old 01-11-2017, 07:33 PM
john thebaptist john thebaptist is offline
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Sorry it was just a note I had wrote a while ago didn't ever mean to post it anywhere
Old 01-11-2017, 09:51 PM
t1simps t1simps is offline
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Thanks for posting this, while there is a multitude of BOB lists posted everywhere I always appreciate seeing people post there own take on it. You never know when something will pop out at you and make you think.
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Old 01-11-2017, 10:11 PM
Sam Ruger Sam Ruger is offline
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After laughing with everybody else I decided to try and turn this into a useful thread. I shortened the OP's list to what is in my own pack. Stuff not on his list is in bold:


Quote:
Originally Posted by john thebaptist View Post
Backpack survival list:

1.backpack: Mine is actually an embassy courier pack. They are designed for cell phones and diplomatic papers as well as basic gear and very, very comfortable to wear.
2. Food: lots of oatmeal, one dehydrated vacuum food pack for two.
3. Fire: waterproof matches, flint, Fresnel lens
4. Water: two quart canteen.
5. Defense: 1 high quality fixed blade (15 inches overall)
6. Medical: three bandaids. Neosporin.
7. Cookware: Teflon coated. one sponge with backside scrubber. One bottle of "Joy" liquid soap.
8. Sleeping bag (mummy)
9. Firearm: Ruger Mark III
10. Misc. one camouflage tarp, two trash bags (one can be used as a poncho), bug spray, sharpening stone, solar flashlight (no need to carry batteries), warm socks, two pairs of gloves (one thin and one set of heavy gauntlets), three extra tent stakes (for the stove), one ounce alcohol stove plus 16 oz's fuel, utensils, telescoping fish pole, small tackle box (pretied), aluminum foil (not a roll, folded flat sheets), Gerber multitool on belt, shoe inserts, insulated long johns, TP, spare underwear. wrist Walkman music system. Two T shirts plus one flannel.
I just weighed it. With a thousand rounds of ammo it's 29 pounds. A pack that weighs over 40 pounds is usually too heavy.

The stuff that I have that doesn't fit in:

Multi-tool hatchet/shovel and saw that you can wear around your belt. The shovel is pretty useless other than for routing water away from a campsite or digging a drinking hole. I also have a three man tent even though I'm one person because it's virtually as light as a one person tent and I want to cover my gear. Insulated R3 self inflating mattress. Thirteen pocket safari vest, wool lined leather jacket.

Things I bought but left behind:

1) Pro medical kit (space)
2) lightweight 12X binoculars (space)
3) Rifle (weight)
4) gas stove (space/weight)
5) rabbit fur hat (another alternative)

The actual original plan was to bug out on a special designed motorcycle (called a "scrambler") which is good for both freeway and off road use. It has a luggage rack for the tent, bedroll, and sleeping bag. My pack sits on the passenger seat (or on my back). A pair of horse saddlebags can be thrown over the seat as well which I intended to fill with last minute food items beyond the oatmeal and one "mountain house" in the pack. The motorcycle helmet is heavily insulated against cold allowing me to leave the fur hat behind. It also acts as a pillow at night. I have been laughed at wearing it when not on the bike but, when it's 20 degrees out, they can laugh all they want. And that icy wind and snow in your face? I just close the visor.

The motorcycle is also necessary to carry a two quart canteen. Water is heavy. Most any of us can carry a quart on foot but not two. My canteen is two quarts because it was originally a "cowboy" horse canteen and the horse carried it and not the rider. So I let the bike carry it.

Up to this point the system actually works. The only question is whether to leave the heavy jacket behind or I have to wear it on the ride. Otherwise, you can go "as is" and even take the rifle although you'd be riding down the freeway with it on a sling on your back. But I have done that (Even walked into grocery stores with it on my back.). After all, I figure I might as well have fun with these toys if EOTWAWKI doesn't happen. The bike can take me almost anywhere. If a horse can get there, I can get there. Some nice looking country out there but not very survivable.

Where the system doesn't work is that you have 1) limited time 2) limited range and 3) limited public land. Limited time with a BOB has been discussed here ad infinitum. You just can't go more than 90 days. The seasons will get you. But limited range is how far the bike goes after the last gas station. Once you run out of gas stations you are limited to about 75 miles on a bike if you still want to have gas to get back. That will not take you past civilization. But, for extra oomph, you can always buy somebody's lawnmower gas. For me, that's an extra 25 miles further out and still get back.

But it's the limited public land that gets you. It really doesn't exist. In the past I have biked to river/creek/lake areas, especially to places where the road is out and then biked around it. The idea was I'd either fish the waters or shoot what drinks from it - Or just shoot a duck.

This is important because if you're not on public land, you are on private land and you are trespassing. That the property isn't posted doesn't mean you're welcome. You ain't. Not when they see that rifle. They think you're going to shoot their cows or are a deer poacher. And they have an amazing ability to find you. Even when I leave the road and go cross country, they find me. Everyone that has ever found me has let me stay (You can't haul a dead cow out on a motorcycle.). But they will question you for at least half an hour first. They're pretty nice people if they decide you're okay. They seem to be good with my 22LR rifle but, if you showed up with something bigger, you'd be invited to leave - possibly at gunpoint. Anyone with a BOB and real rifle probably isn't going to get very far on private land. However, I have no use for big bullets as I have no means to keep the meat anyway. The Ruger will hit to 75 yards (the rifle to 200) and kill anything from 5-20 pounds. My most common takes are squirrels followed by rabbits.

Public land is the bitch. Those rivers, lakes, and creeks? I have seen 2,000 people lined up on the shore to fish them, shoulder to shoulder, some in wheelchairs. And it took me four hours to get there! Nowadays it better be eight hours from nothing or expect a crowd. Just watch the lanes on Sundays coming back out and look for a thousand RV's heading home. There are no fish left there - Guaranteed. And when I skirted that road that was washed out to reach some lake? That didn't work either. You will be amazed at the number of people willing to hike into a lake with no road. They all think just like me. They'll have it to themselves. I have stood on unreachable lakes and seen nothing but human trash and empty powerbait jars as far as the eye can see. One lake I reached this way to fish I was actually the only person fishing. But I certainly wasn't alone. Drunk teenagers were everywhere. They knew the sheriff couldn't get in so they were holding a kegger. Naked teenage girls running around. People rabbiting next to you where you're fishing. Not fun.

People will note I did not include a map or compass on my list. Any wristwatch with hands will act as a compass (See The War of Mankind by I. M. Anonymous). You're just carrying the same thing twice. I did once get in trees that invited getting lost but I simply marked them to find my way back. The problem with maps is that there are four different kinds. There is first, the roadmap. That's usually two maps itself. First a state roadmap followed by a forest service map for when you finally get there. Ah! But a satellite shows you so much more, including houses (Which we're trying to avoid.). But that's still not enough. You need an elevation map. It's real easy to miss elevations on a 70 degree day with the sun out and usually we are drawn to hunt and fish higher elevations anyway. Then the sun sets and 70 degrees becomes 35 or less. Watch your breath freeze in the air as you shiver in your sleeping bag. A single map does not give you all the story. So then you want to carry a smart phone and connect to the internet and get all three. Only guess what? No bars.

Like I said, I thought I'd try and turn this into a useful discussion.
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Old 01-12-2017, 10:06 AM
Indiana_Geoff Indiana_Geoff is offline
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Have you ever walked 2 miles with a 60lb pack?

If yes, put another 20 pounds in it and you might cover your list once a tent and sleeping bag are wet.
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Old 01-14-2017, 06:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john thebaptist View Post
Sorry it was just a note I had wrote a while ago didn't ever mean to post it anywhere
Don't be sorry; the value of boards like these are from the diversity, experiences and input from others. A clear question or easy-to-read response, comment or suggestion just helps others to digest and comprehend. Don't let grammar, punctuation or sentence structure dissuade your involvement as your input and suggestions are valuable...we are all learning, all the time.

Look at what your opening post stirred up...this was helpful to me and others. Some disagree, make suggestions or share their experiences. It's why we have and participated in boards like these.

ROCK6
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Old 01-16-2017, 05:06 PM
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God I LOVE the "conversations" that gear lists generate here....only reason I look at these threads half the time...
Old 01-18-2017, 06:41 PM
kilowatt2736 kilowatt2736 is offline
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Plenty of folks swear they can carry big packs. Me. I'm not ashamed. I know I can't. Maybe 40 lbs across the Wal-Mart parking lot on a bet...but any real distance? NOT a CHANCE!
But hey.... to each his own.
Me? I'll stick with 1 maybe 2 guns tops. And they gotta be light...AND fit in the pack AND have plenty of ammo. And hey...ammo is heavy!
Am sure lots of folks think they need plenty to live off the land, but check out the lightweight backpacking crowd. The thru-hikers on the Pacific Coast Trail or other long distance trails. Sure they resupply their food but realistically nobody is gonna carry months of food though limit yourself to some chow that light and not much variety and don't include wanting to hike long distances .... like hundreds of miles...without re-supply where you'll need hi protein hi calorie intake for all the exertion and 2 or 3 weeks isn't to tough.
And hey ....if you can't re-supply water you're still in trouble. At 8 lbs per gallon water is heavy!
An AR-7 (3.5 lbs) with 250 rds 22LR (~2 lbs) is 5 lbs. Go with a lite weight pistol instead u can knock off a cpl lbs.
Add a major caliber pistol all are pushing 2 lbs ...lite weight revolvers don't have magazines maybe small 357 mag...and 100 rds ammo (3.25 lbs) could be 5 lbs. but almost all other options are gonna be more.
Its hard for me to pass on a 22LR of some kind....just cuz .... but any real amount of ammo for a centerfire is gonna be tonnage if you want much ammo.
223 ammo is 2.7 lbs per 100 rds so that caliber is attractive but hey it would seem keeping guns/ammo weight at 10 lbs would still make heavy pack if you brought much water or food and other stuff.
30 lbs for most of us would be possible if it wasn't winter ...read that more and bulkier cloths....
All y'all young bucks can pack up them 60 lb packs with 3 guns and such ... but it would seem better to be stealthier and slim down the weaponry a bit.
That said ... I can clearly see how nice it would be to have a titanium rifle to go with a titanium 22LR revolver....though can't imagine anyone making one and shudder to think what it would cost.
Guess I will have to stick with handgun to carry reasonable amount of ammo.
Can recall reading 220 rds ammo in mags was std load for patrol in 'Nam. No idea what it is nowadays but can't see wanting to bug out with less ammo than that. So guess serious soul searching needed in order make choices and have enough defense that will be packable for anyone but 20-something studs.
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Old 01-18-2017, 08:03 PM
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someone gets in a gun fight, and needs to fire 210rds , they are probably going to die in that fight unless your well trained.
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Old 01-18-2017, 08:13 PM
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No toilet paper, you gonna use leaves?
Old 01-18-2017, 08:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Writer's Block View Post
God I LOVE the "conversations" that gear lists generate here....only reason I look at these threads half the time...
I will agree with that. This thread caused me to go to the ER, my jaws locked up from laughing to hard.
Old 01-18-2017, 08:38 PM
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No toilet paper, you gonna use leaves?
Absolutely
Old 01-21-2017, 02:00 AM
john thebaptist john thebaptist is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Illinois Crackpot 66 View Post
I will agree with that. This thread caused me to go to the ER, my jaws locked up from laughing to hard.
What was so funny?
Old 01-21-2017, 08:02 AM
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It was the list and what was said but now I know what you were trying to say.
Old 01-21-2017, 08:12 AM
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I still remember my first 10 day backpack trip in New Zealand. My ex- husband and I visited REI, bought everything suggested on the internet, and packed our bags according to the suggestions. I mean, we got "ultra lightweight" everything, and then packed our bags to the hilt so lightweight was a joke... Got to NZ, and quickly shipped back half the stuff in a box. LMBO... Not much guessing for those of us who backpack/camp... you know what you can carry, you know what you need. I suggest doing a few trips and there won't be any more guessing or lists needed. And as for underwear... I always found a way to wash my 1.hair and 2. socks/underwear out there. No reason you have to stink or be ugly on the trail. BOB is just a trail bag, no mystery there. You need food/water/warm clothes/first aid/fire and a bunch of zip locs. Trust me on this ziplocs rule
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Old 01-21-2017, 08:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john thebaptist View Post
What was so funny?
RULE 62: Don't take yourself to damn serious.
Laughter is medicine for the soul.. Go checkout the darkside, there are some funny conversations.
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