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Old 04-21-2017, 07:11 AM
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Originally Posted by trinity93 View Post
Trying to cut weight and space as much as possible. Its just so hard to find good light weight gear in OD green, Dark Earth, or Coyote that doesn't weigh a ton, cost a fortune, or require custom manufacturing.
Look like you have the same requirement as I do. Try find any self-supporting tent in OD color. So far I only knew Vango Hydra series that weight 6.6 lbs for 2 person variant, although the tent do meet EN 5912 (Weather, Fire retardant)
Old 04-21-2017, 07:51 AM
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Oh they are easy to find regardless. Just follow the trail of garbage and broken gear.
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Originally Posted by TMcArthur View Post
Bright colors make it easier for SAR folks to find their sorry butts when they get lost.
I wear pseudo-bright colors for this reason. But I am a single female hiking alone most of the time. I don't want to blend in to the background if I have to send an SOS but am not able to attract visual attention once searchers are out looking. Of course the colors I wear would still blend in if there are wildflowers out in abundance. Bees have mistaken me for flowers dozens of times.

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Originally Posted by .455_Hunter View Post
Sandals or other light camp shoes are an absolute necessity.
As mentioned above, only if wearing hiking boots. I wear trail runners also and don't find a need for them. I do carry a very light pair of silicone "jelly" shoes for river crossings if I don't feel safe going barefoot.
Old 04-21-2017, 08:29 AM
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Bees have mistaken me for flowers dozens of times.
I do carry a very light pair of silicone "jelly" shoes for river crossings if I don't feel safe going barefoot.
That usually happen because how you look in UV spectrum, plenty insects see exclusively within UV spectrum, while feline and canine see mostly within NIR spectrum

You might wanna try Skinners which is a hybrid of socks & Shoes

Last edited by varuna; 04-21-2017 at 08:33 AM.. Reason: adding something
 
Old 04-21-2017, 08:41 AM
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I stayed with AA, it's the Zebralight H52. I want to try the 14500/AA combo since the Fenix RC05 LED can be charged while the battery is in the flashlight and I can rotate out with the Zebra. It's just a little experimentation to see how it works. I typically just buy the lighter Lithium batteries and take a spare. I haven't quite considered an 18650 light yet, but that Zebra one does look pretty appealing...

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I highly recommend you use spare batteries instead of charging any illumination devices using powerbank. You lose a lot of power into waste heat doing so (50% lose during charging the LED battery, and another 50%-70% lose from the battery to LED emitter during operation)
Old 04-21-2017, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by ROCK6 View Post
I stayed with AA, it's the Zebralight H52. I want to try the 14500/AA combo since the Fenix RC05 LED can be charged while the battery is in the flashlight and I can rotate out with the Zebra. It's just a little experimentation to see how it works. I typically just buy the lighter Lithium batteries and take a spare. I haven't quite considered an 18650 light yet, but that Zebra one does look pretty appealing...

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14500's will provide more voltage (brighter) and if regulated the same have about the same run times as an enloop AA. The energy density between the two is very similar. I have a couple Thorfire TG06 laying around the house and use 14500s in them because they really come alive with the higher voltage but the run times aren't great. For some reason the energy density on 14500s isn't nearly has high as 18650's, probably because so much R&D has gone into 18650's to bump them from ~ 2000mAh when they were introduced to 3500mAh now.

After making the jump to 18650 for my flashlights and headlamps all my AA/AAA/C/D stuff have essentially become toys for the kids. The power output, flat discharge, use in cold temps and energy density is just so much better than normal Alkaline or Ni-MH batteries and cheaper and better for the environment than single use lithiums.

Barring a ton of night travel, I could go several weeks without needing to recharge which makes the slightly heavier weight of the 18650 worth it. The H600Fd III will go 30 hours on 62 lumens and that's plenty for me most of the time. I actually find myself using the 26 lumen (66hours) and 2.6 lumen (16 days) the majority of the time.
Old 04-21-2017, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by DuneElliot View Post
I wear pseudo-bright colors for this reason. But I am a single female hiking alone most of the time. I don't want to blend in to the background if I have to send an SOS but am not able to attract visual attention once searchers are out looking. Of course the colors I wear would still blend in if there are wildflowers out in abundance. Bees have mistaken me for flowers dozens of times.
This is an excellent point. My wife has done a few distance solo hikes and that's her reasoning for having brighter colors as well. Personal safety has a slightly higher priority than the stress level of a chipmunk.

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Originally Posted by varuna View Post
I highly recommend you use spare batteries instead of charging any illumination devices using powerbank. You lose a lot of power into waste heat doing so (50% lose during charging the LED battery, and another 50%-70% lose from the battery to LED emitter during operation)
This is a valid point and I wasn't going to use my battery bank for that. That was the purpose of the AC adapter if we pickup a some supplies and have an hour or so to take advantage of an outlet...

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Originally Posted by evilwhitey View Post
After making the jump to 18650 for my flashlights and headlamps all my AA/AAA/C/D stuff have essentially become toys for the kids. The power output, flat discharge, use in cold temps and energy density is just so much better than normal Alkaline or Ni-MH batteries and cheaper and better for the environment than single use lithiums.
This is my fear

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Originally Posted by evilwhitey View Post
Barring a ton of night travel, I could go several weeks without needing to recharge which makes the slightly heavier weight of the 18650 worth it. The H600Fd III will go 30 hours on 62 lumens and that's plenty for me most of the time. I actually find myself using the 26 lumen (66hours) and 2.6 lumen (16 days) the majority of the time.
I will likely make the switch as I have a few 18650 lights and devices and they are proving very efficient for their size. Size and weight are what have been big concerns, but there's value in it if the performance is there.

My biggest issue is that I've had a single-cell battery device fail and have always decided to have a spare battery. AA Lithium batteries are the lightest (lighter than Eneloops), which makes that easier to accept. I'll have to do some weight comparisons and really see what the differences are. The only thing that keeps with the AA batteries is that longevity isn't that big of deal on these shorter section hikes...

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Old Yesterday, 02:01 AM
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One thing I always carry camping, backpacking, etc. Is a commercial restaurant grade stainless steel scrubby pad. Only weighs around an ounce, is durable, compact & conforms into a small place.

Perfect for cleaning cooking gear & if you or your gear ever end up splattered or covered in crusty mud, grime, drying blood, sap, pitch, tar, etc.? This little pad works wonders cleaning you, or whatever up, with a little water & elbow grease.

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Old Yesterday, 07:06 PM
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One thing I always carry camping, backpacking, etc. Is a commercial restaurant grade stainless steel scrubby pad. Only weighs around an ounce, is durable, compact & conforms into a small place.

Perfect for cleaning cooking gear & if you or your gear ever end up splattered or covered in crusty mud, grime, drying blood, sap, pitch, tar, etc.? This little pad works wonders cleaning you, or whatever up, with a little water & elbow grease.
For backpacking our meals are pretty set; mostly boiled water poured into a freezer Ziploc, not much of a mess Still, I have a 1.5x1.5" square of the green scrubby pad. When I do more adventuresome trips where we do more primitive fire/coals cooking with bannock, eggs, fish, etc., I have exactly something like that for scrubbing out pads.

I got a little self conscious several years ago when I was cleaning our cookware in a small mountain stream. I found a couple literally a 50 meters down the creek camping and collecting water for their cooking. I was feeling a little guilty and try to adhere to the LNT methods of cleaning gear away from water sources. A scrubby pad really helps and if you can get one with a lanyard, they can get hung outside your pack to dry pretty quickly.

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Old Today, 07:56 AM
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Originally Posted by ROCK6 View Post
For backpacking our meals are pretty set; mostly boiled water poured into a freezer Ziploc, not much of a mess Still, I have a 1.5x1.5" square of the green scrubby pad. When I do more adventuresome trips where we do more primitive fire/coals cooking with bannock, eggs, fish, etc., I have exactly something like that for scrubbing out pads.


ROCK6
I do the same. Almost all FBC here. The only time that would possibly change is when I'm with other people who are offering to cook.
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