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Old 10-18-2016, 05:38 PM
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But as an example; I've never used powdered eggs and neither as an ingredient in a larger recipe. I am curious if there are little tricks on how best to prepare the re-hydrated egg for use in the recipe. Or, like lard; I know how to use lard but, have never used dehydrated product.
Don't use powdered eggs. There is nothing you can do to them that will make them actually taste good, and the heat of the drying process does terrible things to their nutrition right along with their taste. The only storage egg worth keeping or cooking with besides saved, unwashed eggs from your own chickens is the Ova Easy low-temperature-process crystallized eggs--and for those you just add water per directions and stir.

As for lard, it keeps well in a sealed jar, which is fortunate because you still have to go a ways to find unhydrogenated lard in the US these days. I wouldn't try to find that dehydrated, although I do cook with a lot of dehydrated (and freeze-dried) food. My breakfast porridge every morning uses sweet potato and winter squash powder, plus dried apples or other dried fruit in the winter, and gets sweetened with a combo of date sugar (ground dehydrated dates) and powdered freeze-dried raisins.
Old 10-18-2016, 05:52 PM
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Yes, the shredded hashbrowns do better than the chunky ones.
The Peruvians make dehydrated cooked potato chunks from their golden criolla potatoes. They are called papa seca and are really good. They take a long time to cook as is, but if you soak them in cold water overnight, you can make hot German potato salad (or anything else) out of them with just 5 minutes cooking in a pot on the stove top--which is great in the summer! It also makes them great as a food storage or camping potato that can be cooked with minimal fuel, a nice change from just instant potato flakes in those situations. I imagine you could do this with any boiled waxy potato not overcooked before chunking.

http://www.latinfoodsmarket.com/Peru...sabel_1_1.html
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Old 10-26-2016, 09:41 AM
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I've used several of our preps because I want to be familiar with them.

Dehydrated Butter... you do hydrate it when baking/cooking. Only hydrate the amount you plan to use.

Non-fat milk- Nido powder- etc .... You hydrate and use as regular milk. Nido powder makes an okay cottage cheese (Vinegar cheese) Nido powder tastes the most like real milk. (Nido is in my short term pantry we eat from... Non-fat milk powder is in my long term storage. )

If I'm making oatmeal, I'll toss in a little powdered milk to make it creamy but just use the normal amount of water that the oatmeal calls for. f I add dry fruit, I will add extra water.

I rehydrate fruit for pancakes. I will hydrate in warm water for about 5 minutes or so. Any excess water drained from the fruit is used for hydrating the milk or eggs. I also make cobblers with dehydrated fruit.

I do not like powdered eggs cooked alone. They are not bad but not good either. I tend to use powdered eggs for baking or cooking as an ingredient rather than a stand alone item. My kids & husband will eat them (& didn't know they were dehydrated eggs. )

Potato flakes... I love these. Super easy to cook with. You can use in casseroles etc. Make gnocchi... potato pancakes.. etc. I'm less fond of dehydrated sliced potatoes. You really need to hydrate in hot water and even then add extra water if making a casserole.

Dehydrated veggies. I don't like them as side dishes. They do not taste the same as fresh/frozen/canned. (Although I'd take dehydrated/freeze dried peas over canned peas any day of the week!!) I used veggies mainly in casseroles or soups. Soup is rather fast... a little bullion, tomato powder, veggies, spices, cook 10 -15 minutes. Often I'll toss the cornbread in the oven & then make soup!! I do not buy premade soup mixes. I just make my own. I find it gives more variety and you can cater it toward your familys tastes. You can add rice, noodles etc in also to make soup more filling. In a crisis... Soup is easy to cook and hot food is comforting even in summer.
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Old 10-26-2016, 11:07 AM
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I agree with much of that.

Yes, a lot of dehydrated veggies are best used in stews and soups. The good just rehydrate-and-eats are all low-moisture root vegetables--potatoes, carrots, beets, onions. The high-moisture ones suffer too much of a change in texture unless they're slow-simmered down to mushiness.

Where I disagree is on the dairy storage. Yep, Nido tastes good. There are even better tasting whole powdered milks, but they come from farther away than Mexico and cost much more. And butter powder does work fine in baking.

The problem is what you are tasting in the powdered eggs that is making you spit them out. When you take a food with cholesterol and expose it to very high temperature and a lot of oxygen, you do very bad and unhealthy things to that cholesterol (to any fat actually). Oxysterols will put plaque in your arteries faster than anything you can think of, faster than hydrogenated fats. And there is nothing more efficient for producing oxysterols than the high temperature and total oxygen exposure the occurs with commercial spray-drying of dairy powders. You may not pick up what has happened by tasting whole milk powder or butter powder because their cholesterol content, while significant, is many times lower than the content of eggs. With eggs, it hits your tastebuds upside the head with a 2 x 4. That's one reason why all the people eating too much processed and convenience food, all made with cheap and storable powdered, not fresh, eggs when it contains eggs, powdered butter, powdered cheese, etc. end up with health problems.

So if you care about your long-term health, buy canned butter for storage, not butter powder. Use that to add butterfat back into nonfat powdered milk. (Almost no fat, equals almost no cholesterol, equals almost no oxycholesterol. Drying nonfat milk into powder avoids the oxycholesterol problem of drying whole milk.)

(Butter is canned in the absence of oxygen, which is driven out of the can by the canning process, so also minimizes the problem. For bonus points, the only canned butter sold by food storage companies is from New Zealand and comes from hormone-free, pastured/grass-fed cows. That means it has a much healthier butterfat than the usual butter you buy in the supermaket from cows fed a lot of grain--or than is in the usual whole milk, including that Nido powdered from Mexico.)

If you can store fresh eggs for a while by coating the shells, do so. But you probably will want/need some dried storage eggs if you don't have chickens. Buy OvaEasy low-temp crystalized eggs, not powdered eggs. They do get exposed to oxygen when broken down into crystals, but they are pasteurized briefly at 134 F and then crystallized at 100 F. Conventional powdered eggs are spray dried at 350 F and stored at 130 for up to 5 days to pasteurize them. (They also get yeast added before processing, which adds to their off flavor.)

Info on the process and some comparative numbers on degraded constituents from Nutriom:
https://eggcrystals.com/pages/how-we...-white-protein
https://nutriom.com/pages/s

Nutriom does not publish info on oxycholesterol and claims they don't test for it, probably because they so don't want to advertise that problem. However, research has been done comparing freeze-dried to spray-dried eggs, and the oxycholesterol formation was 25% to 30% less when eggs were beaten up, with consequent oxygen exposure, but then freeze-dried than when they were high-temp spray dried.

So use crystallized rather than powdered eggs for your food storage and use them somewhat sparingly even then. You only have to mix up an egg's worth of OvaEasy and of powdered egg, taste them both, and try scrambling them both to see there really is a world of difference in quality. Watch for sales here and at Costco for OvaEasy crystallized eggs packed and labeled as a cheaper house brand:
www.foodstorage.com
Their premium egg mix is absolutely identical to OvaEasy because it is OvaEasy. I have that straight from the keyboard of OvaEasy's national sales manager.

But use fresh eggs, frozen eggs, or sealed and cool-temp stored fresh eggs whenever you can in preference to even OvaEasy.

Also use freeze-dried or canned cheese in preference to cheese powders. Cheese also has cholesterol, more concentrated cholesterol than whole milk, and there is the same difference in oxycholesterol formation between freeze-drying and spray powdering as with eggs.

It isn't just too much sugar or HFCS, hydrogenated fats, too much salt, or the additives and artificial flavors and colors that make processed/convenience food unhealthy. The way some of the healthy-sounding ingredients are processed before going in to them is also part of the problem.
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Old 10-27-2016, 07:52 AM
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http://durgan.org/2011/ All here.
Selected.
http://durgan.org/2016/October%20201...Potatoes/HTML/ 23 October 2016 Dehydrating Potatoes

http://durgan.org/2016/October%20201...0Carrots/HTML/ 23 October 2016 Dehydrating Carrots

http://durgan.org/2016/October%20201...0Powder./HTML/ 21 October 2016 Making Dried Tomato Powder.

http://durgan.org/2016/October%20201...20Dinner/HTML/ 20 October 2016 Dinner


http://durgan.org/2016/October%20201...0Powders/HTML/ 15 October 2016 Dinner from Vegetable Powders
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Old 10-27-2016, 08:41 AM
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Potato flakes... I love these. Super easy to cook with. You can use in casseroles etc. Make gnocchi... potato pancakes.. etc. I'm less fond of dehydrated sliced potatoes. You really need to hydrate in hot water and even then add extra water if making a casserole.
I like potato flakes as well. I buy 'Bob's Red Mill flakes in bulk and package myself because they're the only ones I've found without additives (mono- and diglycerides is just another name for hydrogenated fat).

I used to use marvelous granulated, not flaked, instant potatoes made in Peru. They truly mixed up into something you absolutely could not tell from made-from-fresh-boiled Yukon gold mashed potatoes, but the manufacturer has either discontinued making them or does not export them anymore.

What you can still get from Peru is precooked and then sun-dried golden criolla potato chunks. If you put them in cold water to soak overnight, they're ready to eat as fast as you can heat them up. Love 'em for easy hot German potato salad in 5 minutes or potatoes with dinner in the summer with no cooking heat added to the house. Because they are made from a firm boiling potato and then somewhat compacted by dehydrating, I find they also stand up well in slow-cooked soups and stews without disintegrating. Nothing added to them in processing either--just dried potatoes.
www.amigofoods.com Papa Seca

I'll use the sliced dehydrated potatoes for a fast-food version of potatoes Anna, but I find the hash-brown shredded ones cook up faster, so I use more of those than the sliced.
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Old 04-20-2017, 10:11 PM
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I've been AWOL and have missed a bunch of really good posts on this thread and I am most appreciative.

As I rather expected, it appears a good canned butter is preferred over flakes or what-not. I know where to get that NZ stuff. Want to try it before I need it. Hate to waste food but, want to make sure I know any tricks.

This processed cheese discussion is a whole other issue. I can only imagine the amount of crap there is out there. I am finding the Legacy and Mountain Creek mac/cheese is not bad. Unfortunately this food item has become an essential kid food.

Thanks everyone. Thanks NY Min.
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Old 04-21-2017, 12:50 AM
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Originally Posted by NY Min View Post
I like potato flakes as well. I buy 'Bob's Red Mill flakes in bulk and package myself because they're the only ones I've found without additives (mono- and diglycerides is just another name for hydrogenated fat).

I used to use marvelous granulated, not flaked, instant potatoes made in Peru. They truly mixed up into something you absolutely could not tell from made-from-fresh-boiled Yukon gold mashed potatoes, but the manufacturer has either discontinued making them or does not export them anymore.

What you can still get from Peru is precooked and then sun-dried golden criolla potato chunks. If you put them in cold water to soak overnight, they're ready to eat as fast as you can heat them up. Love 'em for easy hot German potato salad in 5 minutes or potatoes with dinner in the summer with no cooking heat added to the house. Because they are made from a firm boiling potato and then somewhat compacted by dehydrating, I find they also stand up well in slow-cooked soups and stews without disintegrating. Nothing added to them in processing either--just dried potatoes.
www.amigofoods.com Papa Seca

I'll use the sliced dehydrated potatoes for a fast-food version of potatoes Anna, but I find the hash-brown shredded ones cook up faster, so I use more of those than the sliced.
Have you tried Chuño?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chu%C3%B1o

They are freeze dried whole potatoes from the Andes. In the high mountains they can get the potatoes to freeze at night and air dry in the bright mountain sun in the day. The white version is washed and the black version is not. The black is more bitter.

Amigo Foods sells them too.

http://www.amigofoods.com/bechbl425gr.html
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Old 04-21-2017, 02:15 AM
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This is beginning to look like a French cookbook! LOL I guess there is one similarity to prep cooking; portion control.
Old 04-21-2017, 02:50 AM
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This is beginning to look like a French cookbook! LOL I guess there is one similarity to prep cooking; portion control.
Learning to truly cook well is a important underpinning to being a good prepper cook.

The basics of good French cooking teaches many good fundamentals.

What you think of as high cuisine is mastering how to use ingredients at their most basic level. Something as basic as stone ground white wheat flour is what classic Italian chefs turn into a million kinds of pasta, Belgian chefs turn into exquisite pastries, Germans turn into hearty breads, etc. French cooking teaches basic liquid flavor stocks and sauces you can use in every dish.

If you see a #10 can of dried carrot slices do you just see slightly rubbery reconstituted boiled carrots? Or do you see carrot cake, pureed ginger carrot flowers, baby food, baked carrot chips and crackers, and literally hundred of kinds of soup where carrots are part of your basic mirepoix? And that's just the carrots. I see a #10 can of dried unions and would need a notebook to list all that I could use them in.

Learning to cook really well has so many offshoot benefits. You eat better, cheaper, and finer right now. Your meals have so much less processed factory lab chemicals. You'll feel better and likely lose some excess weight. You'll begin to understand the early principles of all the different kinds of food preservation. You'll learn how food is actually real medicine. You'll be a hit at home parties. Fact is I've known a few long marriages that were held together in otherwise trying times just on the basis of one of them being an excellent cook. And if you are single I promise you that an offer of a fine home cooked meal has as much appeal as a fast Porsche sports car or a long slit designer evening dress.

Don't be daunted. Lie to yourself and swear you'll become the finest chef in the city. That's how art is supposed to work. Strive to be legendary at it. And it's such great fun trying to become the cook you dream about becoming. Lose a few marginal hobbies and dive in.
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Old 04-21-2017, 03:34 AM
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Have you tried Chuño?
Yep.
They are good in revuelto or carapulcra or other stews, although I don't find them as versatile as the papa seca. They need a much longer cooking time as well.
Old 04-21-2017, 05:23 AM
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I started training myself to cook as soon as I moved off campus with a New York Times cookbook (I won't say when). I'm still learning and love to cook. Started as survival mode and soon became a hobby.

This whole prepper cooking with 'new' ingredients is rather like starting over; kinda. I enjoy learning and researching so, that helps. This board has turned into an excellent source for me and I simply can't keep up with all the great information and help.

I will admit to never having worked with Chilean potatoes.

Thanks for the encouragement. I think I'll go whip up an omelet for me and wifey. All this food talk made me hungry.

Hey, while we are chatting; does anyone know of decent camper cookware (coated) or am I going to have to improvise? I like the kits.....
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Old 04-21-2017, 05:50 AM
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I will admit to never having worked with Chilean potatoes.
It's more Peru and Bolivia for potatoes. Chile has great canned seafood.

Zeke and I both live in large, diverse metropolitan areas, and we apparently both like to poke our noses into all kinds of ethnic groceries. People from countries without much in the way of electricity and refrigeration often have foods useful to a prepper's larder. Plus it's just fun finding new flavors and figuring out how to use new stuff. And lots of times, it's very cheap good eating as well.

I don't know about Houston, but in NYC there are a couple of almost infallible rules for finding good cheap food. If you're looking for a restaurant, you want one 1 flight up or 1 flight down from the street. If you're looking for groceries, you want a small store with a cat and lots of labels in a foreign language.
Old 04-21-2017, 07:04 AM
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Oh, sorry, I'll move north a bit for those 'taters.

Understood on the ethnic selections and groceries. Unfortunately unless I know exactly what I'm looking for I can get into big trouble; not being able to read package labels or know exactly what it is I'm fondling. My ethnic searches have been limited to SE Asia, Mex, German and Italian. I do envy the folks back east with their huge selection of world foods. It's always a delight to hit these places when I travel.

Well, ~I'm~ still dealing with prepper-cooking basics here. Obviously I've hooked up with some experts which is a delightful experience.

Thanks.
Old 04-21-2017, 07:07 AM
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"You'll be a hit at home parties."

Yeah, they usually just put me to work in the kitchen once they find out I cook.
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Old 04-21-2017, 07:56 AM
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Understood on the ethnic selections and groceries. Unfortunately unless I know exactly what I'm looking for I can get into big trouble; not being able to read package labels or know exactly what it is I'm fondling.
Getting into "big trouble" is half the fun for me. I just ask the proprietor or the other shoppers what something is/how they fix it if I see interesting stuff I don't have a clue about and can't read the directions for. (Although sometimes you may be better off not knowing what you're fondling until after you've tried it, LOL.)

When I got out of college and into my own kitchen back in the 60s, that was kind of the only way to discover the foods of the world on a limited income--well, other than having your rich uncle pay you to go to exotic places and get shot at. These days, of course, you can also often identify strange stuff and find cooking directions and recipes for it via the internet, not to mention find somewhere to buy it online even if you live in the back of beyond with only one country store to shop in.
Old 04-21-2017, 05:03 PM
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Hey, while we are chatting; does anyone know of decent camper cookware (coated) or am I going to have to improvise? I like the kits.....
The debate about camping cookware is a fairly lively one in the camping section of this board.

http://www.survivalistboards.com/forumdisplay.php?f=11

Give it some time because everyone has their own way. The only tools for cooking I've ever taken to the field is a metal spoon, an alcohol penny stove, and a mucket. You'd be surprised what I can do with those things, my knife, and improvised materials.



I'm just super minimalist that way in the bush. But most folks won't take well to my method. Yet, the rest of the folks can't form a majority opinion on the best way either. So you just have to breeze all those umpteen conversations until someone says something that both appeals to you and they endorse a piece of sturdy gear. Heck, there are some folks here who pack a 14" old school iron skillet!
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Old 04-24-2017, 03:29 AM
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The Peruvians make dehydrated cooked potato chunks from their golden criolla potatoes. They are called papa seca and are really good. They take a long time to cook as is, but if you soak them in cold water overnight, you can make hot German potato salad (or anything else) out of them with just 5 minutes cooking in a pot on the stove top--which is great in the summer! It also makes them great as a food storage or camping potato that can be cooked with minimal fuel, a nice change from just instant potato flakes in those situations. I imagine you could do this with any boiled waxy potato not overcooked before chunking.

http://www.latinfoodsmarket.com/Peru...sabel_1_1.html
Wow. Just looked those potatoes up on your link; $100/15oz. Not likely to make it into my kit anytime soon.

Learned something however!
Old 04-24-2017, 03:56 AM
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Sorry about the utensils discussion; will roll over to the proper board for that.

I do appreciate the 'mucket' comment. Methinks I fit somewhere in the middle WRT cookware.

Now to figure out how I socialize all this cooking information so I don't lose it. :/

Thanks everyone. Amazing stuff.
Old 04-24-2017, 06:46 AM
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$100/15oz. Not likely to make it into my kit anytime soon.
They're not cheap, but they're not that expensive lol. That was $95.76 for 24 bags of 15 ounces each, 22-1/2 pounds of dried potatoes, which works out to about 136 pounds of fresh potatoes. Given that papas criollas are primo very small potatoes along the lines of Yukon Golds, they're pared, precooked, and dehydrated, and they have to import them from Peru, 70 cents a pound isn't that bad.

However, if so inclined, you can certainly buy Yukon golds or new potatoes, peel, cook, and dehydrate them yourself, and get something very similar for less.

ETA:*You can buy single bags as well--you don't necessarily have to get a case. They're just a bit cheaper bought in quantity like that. They keep great in mylar with O2As, and I use a fair amount in various things.
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