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Old 04-18-2017, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by varuna View Post
Just curious why you bring USB Wall Socket Charger? Are you planning to stay at hotel along the way?

I'm not familiar with temperate climate, but what kind of natural SHTF might happen along that particular trail?

BTW IMO you might wanna use different color bag for repair kit and hygiene kit
Excellent questions and input Varuna!

Yes, if we pick up a resupply (usually a Post Office, Hostel or Outfitter store), we can usually plug into an outlet (typically if we stop at a food joint for a hot meal). The AC adapter comes in handy for those circumstances. My wife also carries a 12V USB adapter as some shuttle rides could be as long as an hour as in the past.

Climate for this timeframe (average) includes highs of 80 degrees (F) and lows of 55 degrees (F). Relatively mild, but there are often frequent thunder storms that hit the region.

Most probably SHTF would be a serious mechanical injury. Sure, you could list the low-probability of a bear attack, encounter with a meth-head or serial killer, but those are pretty low on my concern list We do have our vehicle positioned at our end-point because I like having control of that transportation issue. We will park the truck/car and then pay for a shuttle to our start point.

If some regional disaster strikes, the goal would be getting to our vehicle as a priority. We also have friends in the immediate area if needed as family will be more than six hours away. It's no different then traveling for vacation anywhere else. We have contingency plans, but communications are vital. Worst SHTF would be a local burger and beer joint out of beer after coming off the trail...now that would be an emergency!

Good point on the repair and hygiene bags. I have them labeled and they hang on specific sides inside my pack. Very observant of you.

ROCK6
Old 04-19-2017, 06:52 PM
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Nice setup! I was happy to see that Zebralight headlamp. That's the same kind I have. It works great and lasts a long time on just a single AA battery. I use mine all the time for camping/hiking and even at work if I have to be out late. The only real weakness is it's range. It is a flood light and only goes out about 20-30 feet. It's perfect for walking on trails or working in camp after dark though. The wide area of light is very helpful. Running on a single AA battery was the main appeal to me. Hope you like yours as much as I like mine! Have a good trip.
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Old 04-19-2017, 07:16 PM
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All my knife kits keep a few (6) tywraps, a small sheet of rubber off a innertube(folded round my mirror behind the tin) a set of Swiss Tec folding pliers (9 function) plus a small spool of gorilla tape , about 25 feet of 7 strand para-cord and a shackle. and that dont include what is in the knife pouch tin, or the attached saw and ferro rod. I finally found small crescent brand crescent wrench's that that will fit in the bottom of the altoids tin that will fit up to a 9/16 nut.....

Ive always got my Leatherman on the belt, but those lil swiss tec "Bug" pliers set, is cheap (under 9$) functional and tough ( found my first set under the intake spyder on a landrover "salty" they were exposed to weather, water and mud for months, up to a year, before i removed the manifold for repairs. not a ounce of corrosion.)

dont get me wrong, I use tha hell out of my MUT, but this is a tough compact lil unit you can hang off a zipperpull/ loop and it will stay folded until you remove it. I put one on the loop strap of my boot for a week, just sto see if it would fall off while working in tha shop. never did.

i have added a small solar charger (6"X 4") I've just got to figure out how to attach it to tha top of the ruck before summer.
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Old 04-20-2017, 03:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodsman 16 View Post
Nice setup! I was happy to see that Zebralight headlamp. That's the same kind I have. It works great and lasts a long time on just a single AA battery. I use mine all the time for camping/hiking and even at work if I have to be out late. The only real weakness is it's range. It is a flood light and only goes out about 20-30 feet. It's perfect for walking on trails or working in camp after dark though. The wide area of light is very helpful. Running on a single AA battery was the main appeal to me. Hope you like yours as much as I like mine! Have a good trip.
I went away from Zebra for a while and have been using the Fenix HL50. I like both, but the Zebra is lighter and simpler; much better for backpacking. My goal is to see how well the 14500 batteries do and I'm taking a Fenix RC05 to recharge both batteries. These add weight, but I intended to test both out. I will say, I much prefer a single cell flashlight/headlamp when backpacking. It's much easier to gauge battery life than multi-cell lights. I do carry a spare battery (lithium in this case). The nice thing about backpacking, as soon as the sun goes down, it's pretty much lights out anyways

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goblin X View Post
All my knife kits keep a few (6) tywraps, a small sheet of rubber off a innertube(folded round my mirror behind the tin) a set of Swiss Tec folding pliers (9 function) plus a small spool of gorilla tape , about 25 feet of 7 strand para-cord and a shackle. and that dont include what is in the knife pouch tin, or the attached saw and ferro rod. I finally found small crescent brand crescent wrench's that that will fit in the bottom of the altoids tin that will fit up to a 9/16 nut.....

Ive always got my Leatherman on the belt, but those lil swiss tec "Bug" pliers set, is cheap (under 9$) functional and tough ( found my first set under the intake spyder on a landrover "salty" they were exposed to weather, water and mud for months, up to a year, before i removed the manifold for repairs. not a ounce of corrosion.)

dont get me wrong, I use tha hell out of my MUT, but this is a tough compact lil unit you can hang off a zipperpull/ loop and it will stay folded until you remove it. I put one on the loop strap of my boot for a week, just sto see if it would fall off while working in tha shop. never did.

i have added a small solar charger (6"X 4") I've just got to figure out how to attach it to tha top of the ruck before summer.
This is the area I've been force to trim down. Right now, my only multitool is the diminutive Leatherman PS which as worked quite well. I did minimize my fixed blade to a Mora 2/0, their smallest original design. I added a nice Kydex sheath with firesteel and the sheath added more weight than I wanted, but it rides perfectly behind my waist pocket that is sewn to create a pass-through beneath it. It's secured to my pack which isn't ideal, but works quite well for backpacking. I've found I just can't wear anything directly on my waist when distance backpacking, so it's minimal gear in pockets and nothing on the waist but the pack's hip belt. My kit bag is really my preferred method to keep gear close at hand if I have to jettison my pack or if I'm away from my pack. This is where backpacking and "survival" contradict to some degree, but I'm still prepared...my risk assessment just needs to be measured a little closer.

ROCK6
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Old 04-20-2017, 09:00 AM
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I like to use a gore-tex bivvy bag as my pack liner. Slightly heavier but better than a tarp if things go wrong and there are no trees about (although I do recognise that you have walking poles to use if necessary).
Old 04-20-2017, 12:02 PM
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Maybe I missed it but I did not see a spare magazine for your handgun. Otherwise looks like a great set up. Have a great time.
Old 04-20-2017, 12:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sorry-no-clues View Post
I like to use a gore-tex bivvy bag as my pack liner. Slightly heavier but better than a tarp if things go wrong and there are no trees about (although I do recognise that you have walking poles to use if necessary).
That's not a bad idea. I do have a 6oz bivvy bag and that would be a good emergency shelter if my rain fly did get damaged...of course, my wife has her own fly as well, so I could sleep under her hammock I do have trekking poles and I can set up my hammock and fly with just my poles (everything is on the ground, but the poles provide some structure for the grounded-hammock and the fly):



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Old 04-20-2017, 02:13 PM
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Next time I go for a backpack, I'll pop up my gear list here. Hopefully, the ridicule will not be more than I can handle.

This is a really cool site for organizing your pack:

https://www.geargrams.com
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Old 04-20-2017, 02:14 PM
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Lately I've been thinking about forgoing the sleeping bag and going with a down quilt.
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Old 04-20-2017, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by TMcArthur View Post
Lately I've been thinking about forgoing the sleeping bag and going with a down quilt.
I like mine for anything down to around freezing...below that a sleeping bag is a must. I am thinking about selling my down Enlightend Equipment Convert which is a quilt with a zipper aka a hoodless sleeping bag and a great crossover as I really only use it as a quilt. I found it was a good stepping stone to move from bags to quilts.
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Old 04-20-2017, 02:56 PM
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Nice set up.

I'm updating my packs this weekend. It looks like hot weather is here to stay. Swap stuff out that I don't need until the Fall.
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Old 04-20-2017, 03:11 PM
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I'm considering getting a Hammock Gear underquilt to replace the Snugpak Underblanket i have and maybe getting a top quilt from them as well. I also have been considering buying a Granite Gear Crown2 backpack. Trying to cut weight and space as much as possible. Its just so hard to find good light weight gear in OD green, Dark Earth, or Coyote that doesn't weigh a ton, cost a fortune, or require custom manufacturing.
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Old 04-20-2017, 04:18 PM
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Its just so hard to find good light weight gear in OD green, Dark Earth, or Coyote that doesn't weigh a ton, cost a fortune, or require custom manufacturing.
Granite Gear has excellent packs; I really liked their earth-toned colors. It's really hard to find muted colors. And yes, it's almost impossible to get those colors, in lightweight materials that don't cost a fortune. About the place to find them are the cottage manufacturers; which I actually do support, they just aren't cheap

Ironically, when it comes to outdoors gears, according to the Leave No Trace (not your typical militant, hippy environmentalist) principles, they've been advocating for earth-tone and muted colors to blend into the environment and avoid "stressing" the wildlife. Bright, flashy colors are supposedly taboo as they detract from the environment (some of that is kind of bull), but more importantly, those colors supposedly stress the local fauna. I don't know if it's true, but a couple years ago after becoming a LNT instructor I sent emails to several major manufacturers (Outdoor Research, Railriders, REI, etc.) and inquired about them producing more LNT clothing which is muted and in earth tones. I only received a few replies back; Outdoor Research actually mentioned that was valuable feedback. Unfortunately, the flashy and bright colors attract urban attention and boost sales...

Just my bush-hippy story to get more muted colored clothing for the outdoors

ROCK6
Old 04-20-2017, 07:19 PM
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Bright colors make it easier for SAR folks to find their sorry butts when they get lost.
Old 04-20-2017, 09:30 PM
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Bright colors make it easier for SAR folks to find their sorry butts when they get lost.
Oh they are easy to find regardless. Just follow the trail of garbage and broken gear.
Old 04-20-2017, 10:00 PM
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Bright colors make it easier for SAR folks to find their sorry butts when they get lost.
That is the other good argument. Most LNT instructors do recommend packing a brightly colored bandana or T-Shirt that could be used for signaling as well...

ROCK6
Old 04-20-2017, 10:33 PM
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Sandals or other light camp shoes are an absolute necessity.
Old 04-20-2017, 11:02 PM
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Sandals or other light camp shoes are an absolute necessity.
If you're hiking in boots I agree but if you're in trail runners there's really not much reason to pack them. I stopped as soon as I converted to trail runners.


ROCK6, which model Zebralight are you using? I have the H600Fd III with a 3500mAh Sanyo battery and have been very happy with the weight, run times, brightness, settings, etc.


http://www.zebralight.com/H600Fd-III...amp_p_171.html

http://www.zebralight.com/PanasonicS...nly_p_176.html
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Old 04-20-2017, 11:24 PM
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Clever, thinking wife with those fancy silicon muffin-grabbers!
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Old 04-21-2017, 03:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilwhitey View Post
If you're hiking in boots I agree but if you're in trail runners there's really not much reason to pack them. I stopped as soon as I converted to trail runners.


ROCK6, which model Zebralight are you using? I have the H600Fd III with a 3500mAh Sanyo battery and have been very happy with the weight, run times, brightness, settings, etc.


http://www.zebralight.com/H600Fd-III...amp_p_171.html

http://www.zebralight.com/PanasonicS...nly_p_176.html
I stayed with AA, it's the Zebralight H52. I want to try the 14500/AA combo since the Fenix RC05 LED can be charged while the battery is in the flashlight and I can rotate out with the Zebra. It's just a little experimentation to see how it works. I typically just buy the lighter Lithium batteries and take a spare. I haven't quite considered an 18650 light yet, but that Zebra one does look pretty appealing...

ROCK6
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