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Old 01-14-2017, 07:42 AM
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In reference to thermoelectric, I got me a Stovelite Pro from Tegmart - made in the USA. They are located in Vermont. I did have to save up for it. http://www.stovelite.com/stove-lite-pro
Plus 1 on the Stovelite. We did the Kickstarter when they first were trying to get going and have had it for just over a year. I would really like to get a second one.


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Old 01-14-2017, 05:17 PM
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Default Stoves & chimneys

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I have both. I'm sorry to say that you're NOT going to find a do-it-all woodstove that's perfect for both heating and cooking. That's why I have two.

It's sort of asking for a truck that drives like a luxury car, or asking for a luxury car that hauls like a truck.

A cookstove is designed to release a lot of heat in a concentrated area (stovetop) in a relatively short amount of time. They are NOT designed to long, slow overnight burns. Heating stoves are designed with substantial air controls so you can expertly control the burn time for slow overnight heating.

I think though that you'll be served mostly with stove with a flat top like this one.
http://www.thestovedepot.com/harman-stoves.php

You may put a teakettle or frying pan on top, though it won't be able to bake. Stoves like this can be found on Craigslist for 300-400$.

You need to be aware the chimney for your stove is going to cost much more than the stove itself. At my cabin, my stoves cost 325$ and 500$ respectively, but their chimney's cost ~900$ (self-installed to code). Have a carpenter install it, and have it inspected, and it will cost thousands for the chimney.

Do NOT trivialize the chimney. A safe, triple-wall pipe chimney is expensive, and people here are constantly complaining about how their ill-advised installs are poorly performing. You need continuous triple-wall pipe as soon as you pass though anything made out of wood, such as your ceiling, or the second floor. Your best performing option is to position your stove such that it's vertical straight run to the roof without any bends/elbows whatsoever, while minimizing the length of triple-wall pipe. The triple-wall pipe then needs to continue on the outside till you reach the raincap. That's so the hot exhaust gases don't cool to the point that creosote condenses on the inside walls.
Good advice, with one update regarding the chimney: "triple wall" is old school, (and most actual "triple wall" runs too cool and gets dirtier faster than the new stuff) since superseded by "103 HT All Fuel Chimney". The best currently sold in the US is Excel brand, which is stainless double wall solid pack insulated, and meets the Canadian requirement to withstand a 30 minute chimney fire with no damage. All the other brands I know of, even though they are all made in Canada, only meet the lesser US standard of withstanding a 10 minute chimney fire. The price difference is about 10%. Well worth it in my estimation. I used Excel professionally for 15 years or so, and never had one problem with fit, finish, installation, or performance. In any case, follow the manufacturer's instructions to the letter, and if you are concerned about insurance issues, get all the answers in writing from your insurance company before you move ahead.

MichaelK is right about optimal cooking vs. heating, but most heating stoves will serve for cooking if they have a large enough flat top, especially with cast iron cookware. The main drawback of cookstoves for heating is the small firebox, which shortens burn time.

Wood heat is wonderful, and with a first class layout & install it will be a source of comfort and satisfaction for generations to come...
Old 01-14-2017, 05:33 PM
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Unhappy Catalytic woodstoves

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Originally Posted by Light in the Dark View Post
No you won't find something perfect... but I think I have the stove that is the best of all worlds.

http://jotul.com/us/products/wood-st...50-tl-rangeley

This has a machined top surface which is excellent for placing any cooking vessel on. This stove is a front load, as well as a top load (though I never use the top load). One additional feature that Jotul offers for this is a drop in stainless steel grilling surface. This 'Winter Grill' I think they call it, is installed after you flip the machined cook surface up and out of the way. It drops inline of the exhaust and above the firebox.

Its got secondary burn technology, so no cat (cat stoves provide a little longer burn times, but take a little bit more finesse). I'd rather this be a cat stove, but for everything it can do... I think its a great stove for anyone consciously looking for heat and cooking ability.
Catalysts are consumables, and quite expensive, and only found, in my professional opinion, on poorly designed stoves. Well conceived and executed stove designs don't have them, yet they burn just as long and just as clean, without having to replace $300 catalysts every several years, or sooner if anyone runs the stove improperly. Also, many of the mountings for the catalysts warp and burn out from the extreme heat the catalysts create in order to burn the crud out of the exhaust, which heat then mostly goes up the chimney. Non-cat stoves have a proper secondary burn chamber that does the same thing, but makes useable heat, allowing lower burn settings, and also saving on wood consumption. Some Jotuls, most Lopis, and some other brands are worth checking out.
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Old 01-17-2017, 02:55 PM
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Cat stoves are more efficient at turning fuel into heat... its just fact. Everything you said is true in that you do have to burn properly in such a stove, or you will ruin the catalyst.

The newest generation of stoves are actually coming as hybrids, with both secondary burn and catalysts.

Oh, and most catalysts should last up to 10 years with proper maintenance and burning.
Old 01-17-2017, 03:37 PM
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Before you get too far lost in the top efficiency debate keep in mind that there are also efficiencies of capturing the heat, storing the heat, and using the heat.
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Old 01-18-2017, 08:42 AM
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Yes, cast iron and plate steel are almost identical in both their thermal holding capacity, as well as rate of radiation. Soapstone of course is superior in holding, and then slowly radiating. But the drawback is it has to be designed for an area to be just metal, for heating/cooking purposes.
Old 01-18-2017, 09:21 AM
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I have had a couple cast iron wood stoves, both heating and cooking styles. I have also had a selection of cast iron cooking utensils.

You do not need cast iron for either purpose.

Today we have a modern manufactured cook stove. We bought it a few months ago, it as built in 2016.

http://www.kitchenqueenstoves.com/22-480-black
That is a nice stove...a little green here.
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Old 01-18-2017, 08:52 PM
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I believe that stove is manufactured in a factory about ten feet from the property line of my farm. It is made by what I would call pseudo-Amish. They don't claim to be Amish. When they came here most of them lived normal lives with electricity and cars. They are probably good stoves, but I'm not really fond of the people.

The same people have relatives who make stoves in Canada.
Old 01-18-2017, 08:59 PM
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Originally Posted by dirtfarmer View Post
That stove is manufactured in a factory about ten feet from the property line of my farm. It is made by what I would call pseudo-Amish. They don't claim to be Amish. When they came here most of them lived normal lives with electricity and cars. They are probably good stoves, but I'm not really fond of the people.
Are you familiar with Mennonite?
Old 01-18-2017, 09:30 PM
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Yes. I'm familiar with Mennonite. These people were not Mennonite, but they associate with Mennonites and Amish too. Their leader was a part of a horse-and-buggy group in Cookville TN for a while right before they came here.
Old 01-23-2017, 05:00 PM
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Harbor freight had wood stoves on sale and I had a 20% off coupon so I got a wood stove made for cooking on top for only $180 each... I bought two. I assembled one and checked it out and left the other in the crate. They will take wood two ft long. I don't see them listing this stove on their website now though.
Old 02-06-2017, 12:47 AM
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Default Catalytic stoves...

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Originally Posted by Light in the Dark View Post
Cat stoves are more efficient at turning fuel into heat... its just fact. Everything you said is true in that you do have to burn properly in such a stove, or you will ruin the catalyst.

The newest generation of stoves are actually coming as hybrids, with both secondary burn and catalysts.

Oh, and most catalysts should last up to 10 years with proper maintenance and burning.
Yes, the catalysts make lots of heat, and then it goes right up the chimney. They are also very susceptible to "loose nut behind the wheel" syndrome. I've been out of the game for a couple years, so not an expert on the hybrids, but unless the cat heat is captured within the thermal mass of the stove, it's irrelevant. If someone really is convinced they want a cat stove, I suggest they also inventory a couple spare convertors, as the stove won't be nearly as effective once the cat's done. Also, again, pay close attention to the cat mounting setup, as they are historically prone to warping/burning out to the point that a new cat can't be installed without re-fabricating the mount. I'm just attempting to get folks to take a long view, perhaps to a time when re-supply and repairs are not so easy as they are these days... Given that there are non-cat stoves that deliver similar performance, why add complexity? Ultimately, you pays yer money and you takes yer choice...
Old 02-06-2017, 06:48 AM
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Originally Posted by sootsme View Post
Yes, the catalysts make lots of heat, and then it goes right up the chimney.
Many stove designs suffer from sending most of their heat up the chimney unless you design your system otherwise.

Our heating stove puts most of the heat into water so we can store that heat.
Old 03-02-2017, 05:04 PM
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Wondering if anyone has seen this design around much ? I've only seen 2 and I bought both of them. I would like another one

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Old 03-03-2017, 02:19 AM
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You wont be able to cook a lot on a heating stove, you will have a lot of problems, your ceiling for one will start to fall apart above it, you need to ventilate above a cook stove, that wouldn't make sense over a heating stove.

You will most certainly need two stoves to be effective. Plan on placing one with burners designed for cooking on in a location that can be ventilated so the moisture doesn't destroy things and cause mold.

Also, the wood you burn should be good hardwood. Some people will tell you that you don't need that, those people aren't familiar with burning wood as a primary heat source.
I burned wood for 20+ years as the only heat I had, soft woods, poplars, aren't good to burn, soft woods cause creosote build up to fast, they also don't burn long enough to say so for the mess. wood like poplar will burn, but not good, it will stink and make for a dirty fire and ash that stinks too. Wood like oak will have to season for two years before you burn it. Birch is over rated and I would not intentionally try to heat with birch unless I ha a ton of it. The best wood are Rock maple, hickory, beach, regular maple, ash, and elm. steer clear of what's known as California maple its a soft useless wood.
For a cook stove it would be best not to cook on elm. Elm is also a bitch if your processing by hand, it splits very hard. Ash is the easiest to process, and it seasons almost overnight, infact it will burn green and doesn't make up much of a mess, ash also makes great kindling wood.
For the best kindling though find a saw mill and have them give you ceadar slab wood. One pick up truck load of that stuff and you'll have more than enough kindling to get your fires going hot.
For primary heat and cooking you will want the best wood.
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