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Old 03-22-2017, 06:41 PM
Liberty Belle Liberty Belle is offline
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Does your state have a PHRN program?
No--we have EMR (Emergency Medical Responder), EMT (Emergency Medical Technician) something still in development called an AEMT (Advanced EMT) and finally, Paramedic.

I am thinking of going the RN route. As a teacher, I could start now in the summers doing prerequisites so I'd be ready by the time I retire to go into nursing.

Thanks!
Old 03-22-2017, 06:45 PM
Liberty Belle Liberty Belle is offline
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Does your state have a PHRN program?
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Originally Posted by Jedi Medic View Post


Nursing takes over and provides life support for the rest of the patients life. much broader in scope and knowledge.

ive done little else than EMS since i was 18. 49 now and wondering what i'll do when i'm too old to lift those 200 pounders into the ambulance.

please consider nursing.
That is what I am thinking--while certainly stressful, teaching isn't necessarily physically demanding (unless breaking up fights).

Plus, I think some of my interpersonal skills could transfer as well. Thanks!!
Old 03-22-2017, 07:16 PM
Liberty Belle Liberty Belle is offline
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Ever consider chiropractic?
No, not really--I was thinking that might be too physically stressful.
 
Old 03-22-2017, 08:59 PM
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Why only EMS or Nursing? These are not the end all of health career paths.

There are dozens of other medical related fields to choose, and being an RN is not the end all for breadth of knowledge and potential for experience, despite what some would have you believe.

Surgical Tech or a Surgical Assistant (There are big differences between the two), Physical Therapist, Occupational Therapist, Respiratory Therapist, Pharmacy Tech, Medical Assistant, MRI Tech, Diagnostic Medical Sonographer, Radiology Tech (So much to do with this one), Clinical Lab Tech, Dispensing Optician, Cardiovascular Tech, Dental Tech, Dental Hygienist,..........And so many more.

You already have your prereqs. Go see a Career Counselor and then an Admissions Counselor at the school that you're interested in going.

As far as the rest of the stuff goes.....

As someone who has years of both EMS and Nursing experience, I can assure you that both careers do a whole lot of lifting in a days work, and each has more than it share of injuries.

I can also assure you that despite claims by some to the contrary, Nursing and EMS are very much separate fields to work, with neither being better than the other. Though there are a number EMTs that work in various facilities as EMTs, but relatively few RNs that work in the field as strictly an RN......unless in public health or disaster mitigation.
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Old 03-22-2017, 11:09 PM
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People can say many things. As an RN I am going to be a bit biased.

I don't work in the ditch,
I don't work in the heat,
I don't work in the cold,
I don't go into strangers houses,
I have never ran to the middle of a football field.

I like working indoors, in a climate controlled room with some reasonable sense of security. Call me crazy.

I have the utmost respect for the people that do all the things I don't, but face it...... when is the last time you saw a medic over the age of about 35.........
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Old 03-23-2017, 09:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Guntoteninfadel View Post
People can say many things. As an RN I am going to be a bit biased.

I don't work in the ditch,
I don't work in the heat,
I don't work in the cold,
I don't go into strangers houses,
I have never ran to the middle of a football field.

I like working indoors, in a climate controlled room with some reasonable sense of security. Call me crazy.
EMS is where I got my start into Nursing.

Nursing is where I got my start into hospital administration.

Hospital administration is where I got my start into HR.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guntoteninfadel View Post
I have the utmost respect for the people that do all the things I don't, but face it...... when is the last time you saw a medic over the age of about 35.
45 minutes ago.
Old 03-24-2017, 11:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liberty Belle View Post
I mainly want enough training to be of real use in a SHTF scenario, but also try for a short second career. The more I read and research into medical skills and knowledge, the more fascinating it becomes to me.

Probably could have gone into medicine much younger but I really enjoy teaching (most of the time!).
Depending on your current level of schooling, best bang for the buck and speed is RN and will give you a good broad non specific knowledge base. Can continue on to be NP if you desire...

If you're a little more patient, and already have a BS, look into PA schools.

If you want to know how to manage immediate trauma on scene problems, paramedic.

If you want to learn how to do surgeries, and suture, etc... Scrub Tech.

Depending on your age and ability to relocate, look at what local colleges offer for education.

If you want to be useful in the SHTF scenario, then you need the experience behind the knowledge.

Im an RN/RNFA/FNP/PHDNP. I have 20 years of medical experience with more than that for education... in most situations I'm useless without the tools and equipment... I saw a woman get thrown from a car last year. My best tool was my cell phone and a pair of gloves. But there's little I can do to help other than protect her airway - which I was not about to do mouth to mouth...
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Old 03-24-2017, 01:02 PM
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another thought would be the NOLS Wilderness EMT - courses are kinda spendy but they deal with stabilization and longer term stabilization - not exactly sure what that might be stay within Scope of Practice for an EMT but it might be a good compromise
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Old 03-24-2017, 01:50 PM
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another thought would be the NOLS Wilderness EMT - courses are kinda spendy but they deal with stabilization and longer term stabilization - not exactly sure what that might be stay within Scope of Practice for an EMT but it might be a good compromise
There are all kinds of additional training available to all levels of certification/licensure.

The most common encountered are BLS, ACLS, PALS, BTLS, ATLS, and PHTLS. Though there are literally dozens that apply to the many fields within any one profession.
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Old 04-06-2017, 10:53 PM
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Quote:
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I can also assure you that despite claims by some to the contrary, Nursing and EMS are very much separate fields to work, with neither being better than the other.
Nursing is between 10 - 100 times better in terms of money and career opportunities. With EMT, you can train to be a full Paramedic, maybe eventually get to be an officer at your business or maybe move into some kind of management role after years and years and years and fighting for those increasingly hard to get gigs with many others. Meanwhile, you're making completely crappy money.

Nursing base salaries for YEAR 1 can be as much as TWICE that of EMT, depending on the market. Either job has a lot of flexibility in terms of finding work around the country, but EMT is basically a very low level skill.

As pointed out, both jobs have some potential physical aspects to them. But EMT in the street is going to be far more energetic and risky than just about any RN slot. (Unless you want to play flight nurse or something that adds more risk.)

Please don't misunderstand anything I've said in terms of value of people. EMS folks are great. (I've been one - at least as a volunteer - for many, many years.) But the reality is you top out in salary very low unless you to do something else anyway. Your injury risk is higher. (Nurses may do some lifting, but they're not going to be awkwardly carrying obese folks down icy fire escapes in stair chairs or crawling into wrecked cars to ventilate a patient until rescue can do some cutting.) And for someone starting a bit older, chances are good you're going to be spending some of your money on Aleve and Icy Hot.

Sorry Mr. Sockpuppet, but one is better than the other. At least in this scenario. Maybe for a relatively low-skilled kid without degree looking for a great entry level job where you get a lot of outdoor time and some adrenaline rush EMS is better. But not for an adult looking at a second career or added part time thing a bit later in life.
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Old 04-07-2017, 02:12 AM
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RN: Two year AA degree, get a good job and some work experience and then start on your BS degree.
At 51 or 54 you have plenty of time
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Old 04-08-2017, 10:21 PM
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I'm a RN and currently in FNP school. I'm sure you already have some sort of bachelors degree as a teacher. You could find an accelerated BSN program, which would only take you two years to complete. After that, you'll need a several years of experience if you want to be competitive for any kind of advanced nursing degree. I thought about CRNA school before I started applying to NP programs and it ultimately came down to having a bigger scope of practice and it being more practical in the long run.
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Old 04-08-2017, 10:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liberty Belle View Post
I mainly want enough training to be of real use in a SHTF scenario, but also try for a short second career. The more I read and research into medical skills and knowledge, the more fascinating it becomes to me.

Probably could have gone into medicine much younger but I really enjoy teaching (most of the time!).
EMT/Paramedic is a decent choice, shorter Ed time but usable skills.
RN is the best 'bang for buck' IMHO, but be aware that LPN and even 2 year RN's (not a BSN) have pretty limited job prospects in many parts of the country now. We're talking nursing homes and sub acute treatment, maybe doctors offices.

Paramedic would be a great skillset for SHTF, but understand the job side of it is going to be physically demanding if you're planning to work.
The hours and actual physical effort are very different from education.
Did it for years, loved it, but it's work.

I did move off of ambulances and into the ED for several years. Less physically strenuous, more intensive care-wise, but still hard work. It was my favorite time in many ways though.
RN is better nowadays, get a BSN, get your ACLS and other certs, and work an ER somewhere (even one of the stand alones would be good experience IMHO). I was thinking about going back for the BSN, but finished the BS in business and then MBA. Pays a lot better...
Do miss the camaraderie and thrill of patient care in the emergent setting. It's a truly unique and amazing experience. I highly recommend it if you're at all interested.
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Old 04-09-2017, 12:02 AM
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You should definitely give some thought to the work environment/professional culture you would fit in with better, because they are very very different and you will be stuck with it for around 2 years. It won't matter how great the training or how marketable the degree is if you are too miserable to learn it and do well in it.
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Old 05-04-2017, 09:18 AM
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Another vote for nursing. I contracted several years in Middle East and Africa after I left the army. Generally a nurse makes the best non-doctor remote site medic/clinic manager. With short upgrade course they can be paramedics and also a range of doctor level procedures( suturing, minor surgeries etc). They can also serve as the medic on shooter or security teams. Paramedics require a lot more training on the other hand to develope good nursing, general medicine skills. In poor areas of Africa I have seen contract nurses trained to perform general surgery under anesthesia.Not ideal but when you are in a region with 1 doctor per x- thousand people they take any skill they can get.

On a career note nurses always appeared to be one of the most successful remote site or contract professionals I ever saw. Whatever I was doing whether it was security or logistics or project administration there was some kind of nurse on more pay than me. In Australian remote areas very experienced nurses can be awarded nurse practitioner status which is basically a six figure job handling some of the scope doctors can. On international security teams, 3rd world minesites, drilling rigs or offshore platforms a nurse with paramedic upgrade and basic safety certificate are common picks for safety officer or safety manager positions, aka 150K+ salaries. They can also go into business for themselves after this charging thousands a day to be safety consultants. In normal nursing a lot of the rich Middle east employs western nurses ( Saudi Arabia, UAE etc) at decent tax free salaries. And you have the advantage of going home and automatically getting a decent job anywhere you want. Whereas the rest of us regular ex-army contractors come back wondering who will employ us.

If I had my time again I would put in the training to be a nurse. Even if I didn't intend to be one, great skill to have for contracting, general life or SHTF.
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