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Old 08-22-2012, 02:02 AM
tankman1989 tankman1989 is offline
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Question Dry fire compound bow by accident - still safe?



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I was checking the pull on a bow and I accidentally released the string about 2/3 of the way in. It slipped off my 2 fingers. I know dry firing compound bows is a big no-no. I just want to check to see if it is still safe to shoot. It seems like it is fine and I pulled the string back and it was fine.

Just as a lesson, always use 3 fingers when releasing a drawn compound bow - it just gives a better grip.
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Old 08-22-2012, 02:11 AM
DR7429 DR7429 is offline
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What's with the big no-no about dry firing?
I'm new to the bow scene and trying to learn.
Old 08-22-2012, 08:50 AM
Buck-Ridge Buck-Ridge is offline
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Inspect you limbs for any cracks or damage. You got lucky. I have had a limb snap twice on a recurve bow at full draw. Fortunately I didn't get stabbed by the pieces.
Old 08-22-2012, 09:28 PM
Supermag Supermag is online now
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Check your limbs for splinters, cracks or any damage as said. Also, check your cams to make sure they're not bent in any way, check your string and cables (and keep a close eye on them) to see if there is any serving breakage or strands that have come loose, check all e clips and fasteners on the bow to make sure they're still there and tight. I'd also look VERY closely at your cable guard because that little piece of plastic can break real easy and I'm surprised it didn't break.

To answer the question about why the dry fire is a big deal: A bow of any sort generates a huge amount of energy which is largely transfered to the arrow at the shot (the more efficient the bow, the more energy gets transfered to the arrow). When a dry fire happens, the bow has no place to transfer that energy so it has to absorb it all and bows aren't designed to absorb energy.
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Old 08-22-2012, 09:35 PM
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If the cams hadn't engaged you are probably right, when you drew you weren't 'in the valley'? Loose you first few round wearing face protection, just to be safe.

Check;
Limb pockets
limb to wheel joints
wheel bearings
and bus cable to string joiner
... check these items after every few shots for a while and if it feels wrong or sounds strange take it to the bow doctor.

Usually a compound will derail bus cable from cam/s. cable will then grab onto bearing and jam resulting in broken limbs when dry fired.

Have you considered using a release aid? You will possibly achieve better groups as your fingers won't pinch the nock due to short length of most compounds...

DR7249- Dry firing any bow is bad as the energy bound up in the drawn bow, usually used to propel the arrow has to go some ware. In a recurve this energy goes straight to the point of least resistance, usually midway up the limbs. Due to the action of the cams on a compound dry fireing causes a pulse through the string/bus, derailing the cables, then finds its way to the point of least resistance, usually near the 'wheels'
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Old 08-22-2012, 09:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DR7429 View Post
What's with the big no-no about dry firing?
I'm new to the bow scene and trying to learn.
Dry firing a bow is a no no, I never had one explode on me, but was standing next to a guy when he over drew his longbow.

When you dry fire a bow the energy must go somewhere, normally the energy goes into the arrow, but when dry fire it the energy must go into the limbs, thus possibly cracking them.
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Old 09-12-2012, 06:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tankman1989 View Post
I was checking the pull on a bow and I accidentally released the string about 2/3 of the way in. It slipped off my 2 fingers. I know dry firing compound bows is a big no-no. I just want to check to see if it is still safe to shoot. It seems like it is fine and I pulled the string back and it was fine.

Just as a lesson, always use 3 fingers when releasing a drawn compound bow - it just gives a better grip.
I made this error once with my English Longbow, it's a thick piece of bow though so a few times here and there shouldn't be too bad, if it's at full draw it's well dodgy though...
Old 09-13-2012, 01:39 AM
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To check the limbs for cracks use a cotton ball and wipe it over all the limbs if thier is a splinter or crack on a limb the cotton will catch/snag on it...Its not 100% but very close.Then go from thier,most good bows will handle one dry fire with no damage if you dont have it cranked passed 65lbs.
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Old 09-13-2012, 02:30 AM
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The 'no dry fire' rule always confused me. What's the difference if there's an arrow nocked or not? The strain on both the bow and the string should be the same whether there's an arrow or not. Considering how light some new arrows are, I can't see that there would be much of a difference. It just doesn't make sense that dry firing a bow would damage the bow.
Old 09-13-2012, 03:51 AM
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Sure it does.

When you loose an arrow, the stored energy is released through it. When you dry fire, the stored energy has no where to go & causes damage to the bow.
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Old 09-13-2012, 05:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tankman1989 View Post
I was checking the pull on a bow and I accidentally released the string about 2/3 of the way in. It slipped off my 2 fingers. I know dry firing compound bows is a big no-no. I just want to check to see if it is still safe to shoot. It seems like it is fine and I pulled the string back and it was fine.

Just as a lesson, always use 3 fingers when releasing a drawn compound bow - it just gives a better grip.
If you can, get it presses, or press it your self and remove the limbs and check it thoroughly . Glad you are ok, and that your bow made it.
Old 09-14-2012, 11:52 PM
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How abowt that? Learn something everyday.
Old 09-18-2012, 08:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CryHavoc View Post
The 'no dry fire' rule always confused me. What's the difference if there's an arrow nocked or not? The strain on both the bow and the string should be the same whether there's an arrow or not. Considering how light some new arrows are, I can't see that there would be much of a difference. It just doesn't make sense that dry firing a bow would damage the bow.
Most people don't realise that energy released through a loosing arrow is not linear.



Dry firing any bow is bad as the energy bound up in the drawn bow, usually used to propel the arrow has to go some ware. In a recurve this energy goes straight to the point of least resistance, usually midway up the limbs. Due to the action of the cams on a compound dry fireing causes a pulse through the string/bus, derailing the cables, then finds its way to the point of least resistance, usually near the 'wheels'
Old 09-18-2012, 08:37 PM
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Same with what the other people said check for cracks, splinters, shives...Basically make sure everything is solid and not damaged in anyway. If it is, that bow could shatter and possibly really hurt you, not to mention scaring the s**t out of you. Just look over it with a fine tooth comb, better to spend the time and be safe. If you do find something get it repaired they can replace parts on the bow.
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Old 11-10-2012, 08:14 PM
mike75925 mike75925 is offline
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is it that 'dry-firing' a bow (in general) is an issue because it is no longer alive? being that a live tree rejuvenates itself? and a dead one cannot?
Old 11-11-2012, 12:50 AM
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Huh...........?
Old 11-29-2012, 04:07 PM
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Had a Katera I dry fired and checked the limbs after pressing. No problems
Old 02-06-2013, 01:27 PM
andyjohnson1096 andyjohnson1096 is offline
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Take it to your local archery shop. They may be willing to check it for free. A good way to avoid dry fires is to always have an arrow nocked.With no tip and pointed in a safe direction of course.
Old 02-07-2013, 07:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike75925 View Post
is it that 'dry-firing' a bow (in general) is an issue because it is no longer alive? being that a live tree rejuvenates itself? and a dead one cannot?
That's a new one on me Mike. I'm pretty sure dead or alive the stress and force on it would have an adverse effect though.
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