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Old 04-16-2012, 08:35 PM
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Originally Posted by SQD5DRIVER View Post
Snakebite kits are 100% useless for venomous snakebites for several reasons. first, the most harmful components of snake venom, especially when dealing with elapids like our Coral Snakes, or any snake with a neurotoxic component (i.e. all venomous snakes) to their venom, the neurotoxins travel predominantly through the lymphatic system. Once injected, it's in there and you aren't getting it out. Second, even IF there is a venom bolus at the site of the bite, the amount of negative pressure required to "suction" it out, as the snakebite kits are marketed to do, would cause more trauma than the bite itself. There is no scientific evidence that snakebite kits work. Sawyer has made millions of dollars off of folklore and bad "science". The theory is somewhat reasonable but when subjected to scrutiny and real-world application, it comes up lacking in the worst way.

Snakebite kits = a waste of money and space.
roller bandage and a pad.
different snakes here though.
Old 04-16-2012, 08:36 PM
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Non-poisonous snake bites carry a heavy load of bacteria and infection.

I read Python bites can be lethal because of the infection.
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Old 04-16-2012, 08:41 PM
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Originally Posted by txflyboy View Post
Non-poisonous snake bites carry a heavy load of bacteria and infection.

I read Python bites can be lethal because of the infection.
Not so much you drop dead but they are meat eaters and carry the bacteria that meat eaters carry. goannas are the same
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Old 04-16-2012, 08:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Kymudder08 View Post
The recluse spiders are interesting. The bites don't always result in necrosis. But the venom will be in your blood forever. All it did to my dad was after a few years was his hads started cracking and bleeding alot as if they were severely chapped. Also, the blood will move on its own under microscope. Freaked my dads nurse out lol

Another way to tell a venomous snake is the tail. If its blunt it's deadly, long and pointy its harmless. But copperheads aren't much to worry about unless they bite a small child. From what I've learned there's never been a recorded death from a copperhead. They're also on almost every continent and almost every state.

Black widows also aren't really deadly. I've met a guy bit by one and he said the venom attacks the nervous system and it's the most excruciating pain you'll ever experience in your life. I've also never heard of a death by black widow.

Only snakes I'd really worry about are the rattlers and the water moccasin, at least in the USA.

Those in Australia, y'all got the short end of the stick lol

1) Recluse venom does not stay in your blood forever. It will be metabolized and /or fought like any other foreign substance. I'm not sure what you meant by the blood moving on its own under the microscope, but blood work and evaluation is the realm of the pathologist, not a nurse. Don't put much stock in her freaking out...

2) Identifying snakes by the "pointyness" of the tail is unsound and perplexing. Pointy compared to what? I've yet to see a Cottonmouth, Copperhead, Coral Snake, or any other new world Pit Viper with a "blunt" tail. Go Google some photos of a Bushmaster or Fer de Lance and explain how you'd differentiate between their tail and any rat snake... Apart from the pattern, it ain't happening. Same applies to any venomous snake in the U.S. with the obvious exception of rattlesnakes but they have a clue attached to their tails (usually, they do sometimes break off).

3) There are recorded fatalities resulting from Copperhead bites. They are rare, but they have happened and are well documented.

4) "They're also on almost every continent and almost every state." - If that is regarding Copperheads, it is not accurate. Copperheads have a limited range through the eastern and central U.S.

5) Black Widows are absolutely deadly. See #3 above. Same applies.

6) Having been bitten by a Black Widow myself, and speaking to others who have been, I can attest to the fact that it IS painful, though not as excruciating as the "guy" you met. Trust me, even a small pygmy rattlesnake bite is much worse. You'll feel more pain whacking your thumb with a hammer than you will with a widow bite. The worst bites will feel like a good bee sting. I think the fellow you met was stretching the truth a bit.

And the usual disclaimer - I'm not trying to be a tool or call anyone out. I've just seen far, far too many threads and posts about venomous bites and stings that are full of bad and dangerous information and advice. My responses are not meant to be a personal attack on anyone, but rather a realistic rebuttal to less than accurate statements based on my own knowledge and research over many years. In a perfect world, I would hope that no one believes a word I say and actually takes the time to research and learn this stuff on their own.
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Old 04-16-2012, 08:52 PM
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Originally Posted by dontbuypotteryfromme View Post
roller bandage and a pad.
different snakes here though.
Yep. With you guys, a lymphatic wrap is called for and when properly applied, WILL slow the flow of lymphatic fluid and lessen the effects of many bites. Some of those things you all have though...whew! I really doubt a wrap would do much for a Taipan bite. You get hit my one of those too far from help and all that's left to do is pray and get right with the God of your choice. I've handled Cobras, Mambas, Kraits, and any Pit Viper or true viper I could get my hands on. The only snake I refused to handle when given the opportunity was an Inland Taipan. Never never never.
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Old 04-16-2012, 09:03 PM
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Thanks for the excellent knowledge Driver....



O.k. let's go a different direction. Everyone knows what this is. Especially if it effects you.
This little nasty noxious vine irritates probably more people in North America than any other. And if you inhale the smoke while it's burning, it can kill you. Know what it is and how to identify it?
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Old 04-16-2012, 09:06 PM
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Originally Posted by A-Team View Post
I've seen Brown Recluse bites that were 10 years old and still necrotic.
Most likely not a Recluse bite then. Loxoscelism just doesn't last that long. The majority of "Recluse" bites that I have seen in the field and in hospitals ended up being MRSA or other ulcerative skin conditions. That's not to say that the initial cause of necrosis wasn't a Recluse, but if it did last 10 years, there were other underlying causes that prevented the bite from healing. Now the question would be: who diagnosed the bite AS a Recluse bite initially, and what sort of medical treatment did the patient seek afterward? In cases of extended Loxoscelism, the affected area would most likely be excised and grafts would be placed (depending on the size and location of the "bite"). I've got one on my right knee that happened earlier this year. The ONLY way I know for a fact that it's a recluse bite? I caught the little booger in the act. Now there's a quarter-sized scar on my knee. All I did was scrape off some dead tissue and cut out a bit of the surrounding area (did a local on myself at home) and kept it clean.

For what it's worth, the few genuinely BAD Recluse bites that I've seen were on A) geriatric patients or B) folks who whose hygiene was less than stellar...

The bites can be bad, but there's no reason to let them get as nasty as a lot of the photo's that circulate on the internet (many of which do not even depict Recluse bites).
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Old 04-16-2012, 09:09 PM
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Originally Posted by txflyboy View Post
Thanks for the excellent knowledge Driver....



O.k. let's go a different direction. Everyone knows what this is. Especially if it effects you.
This little nasty noxious vine irritates probably more people in North America than any other. And if you inhale the smoke while it's burning, it can kill you. Know what it is and how to identify it?
Cilantro!!!
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Old 04-16-2012, 09:14 PM
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No, not cilantro...

You're going to have attorney's calling us....
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Old 04-16-2012, 11:26 PM
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Originally Posted by SQD5DRIVER View Post
If you can discern the shape of the pupil, you've probably already been bitten. And here in the U.S., all of our elapids (Coral Snakes) have round pupils. I assure you, they are not to be trifled with.
LOL

That's exactly what I wrote.
Old 04-16-2012, 11:31 PM
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Originally Posted by txflyboy View Post
Non-poisonous snake bites carry a heavy load of bacteria and infection.

I read Python bites can be lethal because of the infection.
Large pythons can rip you to shreds.

And most are quite nasty....of the large ones, only the Burmese are on the more mellow side. (Altho the Aussies have a few nice ones...like black-headed pythons. I love those!)

I know full-on snake hunters who have left footprints UP WALLS to escape large African pythons that were loose in a house.
Old 04-16-2012, 11:33 PM
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Originally Posted by txflyboy View Post
Thanks for the excellent knowledge Driver....



O.k. let's go a different direction. Everyone knows what this is. Especially if it effects you.
This little nasty noxious vine irritates probably more people in North America than any other. And if you inhale the smoke while it's burning, it can kill you. Know what it is and how to identify it?
Been there, had that.

I knew that aerosolized, the oil could cause external symptoms, but not internally. Interesting.
Old 04-16-2012, 11:45 PM
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A guy who is having a reaction to a Brown Recluse bite.
Old 04-16-2012, 11:46 PM
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That's not a violin. It's an hour glass.
Old 04-16-2012, 11:55 PM
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Out here instead of Poison Ivy we have Poison Oak and Poodle Dog Bush. Poison oak is very pretty in the fall.
Old 04-17-2012, 12:26 AM
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Originally Posted by 9MMare View Post
Been there, had that.

I knew that aerosolized, the oil could cause external symptoms, but not internally. Interesting.

Imagine the rash it gives you on the inside of your lungs...
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Old 04-17-2012, 01:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SQD5DRIVER View Post
Most likely not a Recluse bite then. Loxoscelism just doesn't last that long. The majority of "Recluse" bites that I have seen in the field and in hospitals ended up being MRSA or other ulcerative skin conditions. That's not to say that the initial cause of necrosis wasn't a Recluse, but if it did last 10 years, there were other underlying causes that prevented the bite from healing. Now the question would be: who diagnosed the bite AS a Recluse bite initially, and what sort of medical treatment did the patient seek afterward? In cases of extended Loxoscelism, the affected area would most likely be excised and grafts would be placed (depending on the size and location of the "bite"). I've got one on my right knee that happened earlier this year. The ONLY way I know for a fact that it's a recluse bite? I caught the little booger in the act. Now there's a quarter-sized scar on my knee. All I did was scrape off some dead tissue and cut out a bit of the surrounding area (did a local on myself at home) and kept it clean.

For what it's worth, the few genuinely BAD Recluse bites that I've seen were on A) geriatric patients or B) folks who whose hygiene was less than stellar...

The bites can be bad, but there's no reason to let them get as nasty as a lot of the photo's that circulate on the internet (many of which do not even depict Recluse bites).

If I may pick your brain on this subject....
How would I identify a brown recluse bite if I didn't catch the little fecker in the act?
Old 04-17-2012, 01:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SQD5DRIVER View Post
Yep. With you guys, a lymphatic wrap is called for and when properly applied, WILL slow the flow of lymphatic fluid and lessen the effects of many bites. Some of those things you all have though...whew! I really doubt a wrap would do much for a Taipan bite. You get hit my one of those too far from help and all that's left to do is pray and get right with the God of your choice. I've handled Cobras, Mambas, Kraits, and any Pit Viper or true viper I could get my hands on. The only snake I refused to handle when given the opportunity was an Inland Taipan. Never never never.
Yeah. They have a bit of angry about them too. They will chase you.
Old 04-17-2012, 01:37 AM
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Originally Posted by 9MMare View Post
Large pythons can rip you to shreds.

And most are quite nasty....of the large ones, only the Burmese are on the more mellow side. (Altho the Aussies have a few nice ones...like black-headed pythons. I love those!)

I know full-on snake hunters who have left footprints UP WALLS to escape large African pythons that were loose in a house.
I would believe it. Had a guy try to get rid of a large reticulated one once. It was kind of an epic battle by the end of it.
Old 04-17-2012, 01:47 AM
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Reticulated Python

Are these the guys that are taking over the Florida Everglades?
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