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Old 04-03-2012, 07:53 PM
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If that's what you want to do, then go for it. Get started ASAP.

Suggestion:

There are some great people on this forum, but you really need to talk to someone face to face and get your questions answered.

Go to a forestry station or wherever those people who are in this profession work and talk to them. Find out what their job is, what they like about it, the type of work that they actually do, their daily routine, etc. Also, find out how they got started, what education you should seek first, and any suggestions they might have for someone just getting started in that career.

Note: As a courtesy, call ahead and make an appointment. At age 16, it will show responsibility and make a good impression. Also, bring a gallon of ice cream or a pie as a thank you for taking the time to talk with you. Don't tell them you are bringing it, just show up with it.

People come by the fire station all the time asking those very questions. I'm more than happy to take the time with them.
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Old 04-03-2012, 08:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaFireMedic View Post
If that's what you want to do, then go for it. Get started ASAP.

Suggestion:

There are some great people on this forum, but you really need to talk to someone face to face and get your questions answered.

Go to a forestry station or wherever those people who are in this profession and talk to them. Find out what their job is, what they like about it, the type of work that they actually do, their daily routine, etc. Also, find out how they got started, what education you should seek first, and any suggestions they might have for someone just getting started in that career.

Note: As a courtesy, call ahead and make an appointment. At age 16, it will show responsibility and make a good impression. Also, bring a gallon of ice cream or a pie as a thank you for taking the time to talk with you. Don't tell them you are bringing it, just show up with it.

People come by the fire station all the time asking those very questions. I'm more than happy to take the time with them.
sounds good to me. ill call the missouri department of conservation. they are very close and have a lot of fishing and hunting land that i know is managed regularly. ill ask to shadow someone
Old 04-04-2012, 09:48 PM
r2d246 r2d246 is offline
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I think the thing with any type of Ranger job or what you think is conservation turns out to be basically a bi law officer of the forest. You spend your life in the area of what you love, instead of helping people to enjoy nature, making those campers, hunters, lives miserable. That's your job. Your a revenue generation officer in other words. You have to find ways to make the tickets fly off that ticket book. They won't tell you any of that during the college part of it. Once you get into the job though very quickly they'll train you how to generate revenue. That's all it's about.

This was no different back in the mid evil times of England. They would pose a tax on any game you caught, caught without paying and you face time in jail or heavy fines. Then if they wanted to they'd bann peasents catching big game. It's been the same ever since. It's just a form of tyranny under the pretext of "conservation", just another money making scheme.
Old 04-04-2012, 10:41 PM
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I think the thing with any type of Ranger job or what you think is conservation turns out to be basically a bi law officer of the forest. You spend your life in the area of what you love, instead of helping people to enjoy nature, making those campers, hunters, lives miserable. That's your job. Your a revenue generation officer in other words. You have to find ways to make the tickets fly off that ticket book. They won't tell you any of that during the college part of it. Once you get into the job though very quickly they'll train you how to generate revenue. That's all it's about.

This was no different back in the mid evil times of England. They would pose a tax on any game you caught, caught without paying and you face time in jail or heavy fines. Then if they wanted to they'd bann peasents catching big game. It's been the same ever since. It's just a form of tyranny under the pretext of "conservation", just another money making scheme.
at the missouri department of conservation, they annually grow fields for game, maintain and create new ponds, and stock them for everyone to fish in. you are allowed to hunt there, keep your game, keep your fish, hike, bike ride, and do many other fun outdoor related activities when you are tired of school or working.it doesn't pay for itself. they create a sportsman's environment and you know what, i think the people who throw trash on the ground should be fined. the licenses should be needed. i don't mind paying a little to help maintain a place i love. they also educate youths and high school students. if you really think this is a corrupt money making scheme, you need to reconsider what you are judging here.
Old 04-06-2012, 10:28 AM
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Default Wildlife Management

I got my BS in Wildlife from Humboldt State Univ in northern California. Humboldt State has one of the best wildlife programs in the nation, the other is in Montana.
Willdife management is hands-on field work. Examples of classes : Ecology, mammalogy, ornithology, wildlife techniques ( using GPS, tracking, dart guns,trapping, restraint, etc), zoology, upland game management, mammal management, wildlife diseases, wildlife populations, plant ecology, etc. THE ONLY MATH CLASS YOU HAVE TO TAKE IS STATISTICS! This is from a math challenged guy
With a BS in wildlife you are set to take positions starting in the $50,000 range. They are outside jobs usually working within national forests or parks as part of that states parks and wildlife department, or federal. The types of work : habitat restoration, habitat maintenance, fire management, wildlife research, fishery research & farming, game management, field studies on endangered species, etc. WHAT YOU DONT DO IS : Any law enforcement ( you are not a park ranger, game warden ), lab work, or boring work
Examples of postions : tracking wolves in Montana, fire management in Gulf Coast Texas, big horn sheep population studies in Utah, managing game fish populations in a fishery in Florida, moose population management in Alaska, mongoose eradication in US Virgin Islands, snake eradication in Guam, checking duck tags in wildlife management areas allowign hunting, habitat resytoration to increase populations of bald eagles in Maryland, same for spotted owls in beautiful northern CA, same for pumas in Everglases Nat Park,.....I can go on and on....
Really, I can give you much more info but only if I know you want to work in the outdoors, with animals, as a wildlife professional, with a BS degree, and yes, self employed is a possibility as is working for private sector.
I hope I have answered your questions and concerns. I liked the major becuase it was hands on with animals in the outdoors. I have been employed in private sectors doing wildlife education using live wild and exotic animals.
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Old 04-06-2012, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Crochunter View Post
I got my BS in Wildlife from Humboldt State Univ in northern California. Humboldt State has one of the best wildlife programs in the nation, the other is in Montana.
Willdife management is hands-on field work. Examples of classes : Ecology, mammalogy, ornithology, wildlife techniques ( using GPS, tracking, dart guns,trapping, restraint, etc), zoology, upland game management, mammal management, wildlife diseases, wildlife populations, plant ecology, etc. THE ONLY MATH CLASS YOU HAVE TO TAKE IS STATISTICS! This is from a math challenged guy
With a BS in wildlife you are set to take positions starting in the $50,000 range. They are outside jobs usually working within national forests or parks as part of that states parks and wildlife department, or federal. The types of work : habitat restoration, habitat maintenance, fire management, wildlife research, fishery research & farming, game management, field studies on endangered species, etc. WHAT YOU DONT DO IS : Any law enforcement ( you are not a park ranger, game warden ), lab work, or boring work
Examples of postions : tracking wolves in Montana, fire management in Gulf Coast Texas, big horn sheep population studies in Utah, managing game fish populations in a fishery in Florida, moose population management in Alaska, mongoose eradication in US Virgin Islands, snake eradication in Guam, checking duck tags in wildlife management areas allowign hunting, habitat resytoration to increase populations of bald eagles in Maryland, same for spotted owls in beautiful northern CA, same for pumas in Everglases Nat Park,.....I can go on and on....
Really, I can give you much more info but only if I know you want to work in the outdoors, with animals, as a wildlife professional, with a BS degree, and yes, self employed is a possibility as is working for private sector.
I hope I have answered your questions and concerns. I liked the major becuase it was hands on with animals in the outdoors. I have been employed in private sectors doing wildlife education using live wild and exotic animals.
wow thanks for the helpful post. i can't stress enough my love for the outdoors so yes i would love field work especially.
Old 04-07-2012, 08:03 PM
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I give my $.02 worth.

Some of you may think this is corny or whatever but it is something I think would have enjoyed if I would have started over 20 years ago.

I really like the TV show Wild Justice. It basically is a Cops show but follows a group of California Game Wardens when on duty. What appeals to me is that the Wardens are out in nature. Sure they patrol and deal with riffraff on a daily basis but they are out in the wilderness doing what they love and protecting the environment the really enjoy and appreciate. Essentially they are law enforcement protecting wildlife and the environment. Much better than being a LEO in the big city.

I would guess the pay is pretty good and they have excellent benefits and retirement as well. If you have interest in any thing of this nature you could start with chatting up a local game warden to your area on what his career is like and how one would get started in such a field. I'd bet they would be more than willing to tell you everything they know.

At least here in Cali very few people have the ability to CCW and this is one way you could do such anthing while off duty legally. MO is probably different though.
Old 04-07-2012, 09:34 PM
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Dodge, the big problem for you is the lack of a good career tract.

I got my BS in Forestry in the early 80's up in the northwest. While still a student I got my first summer job with the US Forest Service, involved in Silviculture. Planting trees in the spring, conducting timber surveys during the summer, and fighting fires whenever they popped up.

Still worked as a temporary summer hire even after I got my degree. Saw guys (and girls) with a degree (some with Master's) married, having kids, and still having only summer positions.

Finally decided that I was never going to get a full-time position because so many very qualified people were already ahead of me.

In 1985 I decided to get back to school. Got a Master's in plant pathology, then got a doctorate in genetics. Now I have a very well paying microbiologist position that has provided me with a good living.

The funny thing though is that my good position has given me the income to purchase my own land, 40 acres of oak and pine, where I practice my forestry skills for my own benefit.

What I'm trying to tell you is don't try to get a job in the outside just because you like being outside. Get a major newspaper and go to the want ads. Look to see who's hiring whom. Most likely, the people they'll be hiring 4 years from now are the same types they're hiring today. Let what's in-demand guide you into a successful profession.
Old 04-07-2012, 11:46 PM
Bajatacoma Bajatacoma is offline
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My two cents worth? Go for something that has more potential. I've got a BS degree (four year from an accredited school and yes, there are other good schools besides those listed already) in Aquaculture, Fisheries and Wildlife Biology and I've spent most of the past twenty years working as a paramedic as have two other wildlife biologist I know; I also know several others working in other fields. Game warden jobs are hard to come by and very political (at least around here); most of the biologist have masters and are competing for GS5 level jobs. That said, I worked as a field biologist for a while before getting into EMS and then did consulting on the side for some years and generally enjoyed it, but it's a hard field to make any money at.
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