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Old 06-29-2011, 09:41 AM
augoldminer augoldminer is offline
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I had more fun with about a acre ranch pond that had been over run with carp.

No one knew where the carp came from as the pond is fed from a spring.
it was a bass and catfish pond till the carp appeared by what we think was eggs carried by ducks from a river a couple miles away.

We did this in late fall just before freezing weather

1 case of dynamite and a 500 foot roll of 200 gpf primer cord

The whole pond surface went into the air. then we used blue stone to kill any fish left. The hard part was getting the carp out of the trees

About february they started to restock the pond with bass. crawdads. and cats from another pond on the ranch.
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Old 07-08-2011, 06:19 PM
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Default Carp...that's what for supper?

Though it is considered a "trash" fish, if we can put our pride aside for a moment...the wife of my landlord many years ago (Cajun who had a recipe for just about anything) would "pressure cook" carp. Depending on the spices used, I swear would taste like tuna or salmon (really). Talk about an underutilized resource.
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Old 08-07-2011, 08:23 AM
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Crab bait!!!
Old 03-31-2012, 01:17 AM
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Grind them up, excellent fertilizer!
Old 03-31-2012, 03:48 AM
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Ughh one of the few posts I really wish that had not been dug up. It sure is unfortunate how uneducated we are in North America to the bounty that is thriving in our waters. I do however speak of the common carp and not the asian. Although as a prepper I would think a prepper would enjoy seeing a fish that can survive on some pretty nasty waters. Let's be honest if we loose the people getting paid to keep trout, walleye, bass etc... in the waters.. well all that's left is pond full of garbage.

There is a problem in the US with carp (common) numbers in the extreme's which is a bad thing. But I say this look at Europe in which the carp is revered as a sport fish. The numbers in there ponds/rivers are no where near as bad as ours. Could this be to a education problem?

Cleaning a carp sucks hands down, but wait there's another popular game fish in North America just as hard to clean. Pike and Musky share many common features of the carp as far as bone structure. I have also heard people say it taste gross, I guarantee the bulk of those people making that statement have never tasted an oily fish.

The thing that bugs me the most about people griping about carp is they say "well carp eat all the bass eggs" ughh that has to be one of the dumbest statements that has been passed down to idiots over the years. I encourage those to believe this is true to research "bass spawning beds" enjoy the videos of what appears to be a sadistic fish killing for fun. Although it is just protecting the fry's.

If anyone would like an education course on the common carp I would enjoy telling you what I have studied through the years and also sending the emails/links to University's across the world that are just full of info.

Now that my short rant is over (I held a LOT back), this argument is for the common/grass carp and not the Asian carp. I have little hands on experience with the Asian carp ATM. Although it does appear to be a bountiful food source.

Also as far as using them as fertilizer, I am sure it would be amazing for compost. Just do not forget to see the fresh meat on the bones. Actually take everything I said back, if the "SHTF" few will know how to catch/clean/prepare the fish that will more then likely be the only thing left alive in the waters.
Old 03-31-2012, 07:06 AM
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I pickle and I smoke and I easily catch way more carp than I can easily eat. I will not throw them back in the water. Norway Spruce like carp just fine. More people need to learn to fillet and to pickle fish if they are in a place where smoking them isn't feasible. (ie, high rise apartment in Chicago) Pickling fish is easy and recipes are even easier to find. Great prep food for storage.
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Old 03-31-2012, 07:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeeso View Post
So...

There is a pretty large lake/pond in my neighboorhood. About the size of two football fields. It used to be filled with Largemouths, yellow perch, catfish, white perch, bluegill, and crappie. However, about 3 years ago I noticed carp starting to emerge in the lake. Now... it has been overun. The bass fishing, while still there, is not like it used to be. I used to be able to spot them all the time from the shoreline, now I see close to none unless I catch them. But there are carp, EVERYWHERE.

Giant schools of them. Today I was up there in the morning before work. They were everywhere, I have never witnessed something so strange while fishing. They were all over the shoreline, splashing and darting around in water so shallow their backs were visible. It was so loud. Every 5 feet there were groups of 3-4 carp just going nuts. It was around the entire lake, I could hear and see the water splashing all the way on the other side of the water, and it was happening right at my feet as well.

What do you recommend I do? I know they eat the eggs of other fish, which is probably why there are hardly any of the other species left. Are there environmental groups that will do a controlled removal of them and relocate the fish? I despise carp, there is no sport in catching them, they are hideous looking and I could probably catch them with my bare hands.

I am almost half tempted to catch them, and throw them in a stream and let the fish gods do what they please with them.
You and the other fishermen need to catch and remove the carp from that pond. Dispose of them. Do not relocate them.

Bottom Line: Do you like to watch and catch carp or other species?
Old 03-31-2012, 08:01 AM
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we used a fish stunner on the bottom of a dingie in the black wood river and just net them the native fish come to in a few mins, then we use the the carp as compost been doing it for years i know a commercial company started up using the carp for compost, now we have to get the red throat perch
Old 03-31-2012, 02:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Grump View Post
I pickle and I smoke and I easily catch way more carp than I can easily eat. I will not throw them back in the water. Norway Spruce like carp just fine. More people need to learn to fillet and to pickle fish if they are in a place where smoking them isn't feasible. (ie, high rise apartment in Chicago) Pickling fish is easy and recipes are even easier to find. Great prep food for storage.
I loved smoked carp and have a hard telling it apart from other oily fish that are commonly smoked. I wish I had a place to smoke the fish on my own. Every year I got to the Mississippi and I trade the fresh carp I caught during the weekend for a decent portion of smoked and pickled carp and bullhead from a fish house that I frequent.

Grump would you mind sharing your recipe for pickled fish with me. It is something I always wanted to try on my own.
Old 03-31-2012, 03:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beserker View Post
Ughh one of the few posts I really wish that had not been dug up.
Really? FW is my field, I like this thread and the conversation it creates. The details of the situation are lacking to make educated assertions in this case, but it creates an opportunity for important discussion. Is this a natural body of water or man made? Is this a native species or invasive? Many important species of wildlife have been "persecuted" based on appearance or the fact that they compete with other species humans favor. At the same time invasive species are a serious problem. If this a natural body of water with a sudden shift in population there is something wrong. Either way, short of draining the lake which has it's own consequences, the carp are likely there to stay. But it was good to see those who spoke up and told the OP not to release them in neighboring waters. It's good to see people take an interest in our waters.
Old 03-31-2012, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakota View Post
Really? FW is my field, I like this thread and the conversation it creates. The details of the situation are lacking to make educated assertions in this case, but it creates an opportunity for important discussion. Is this a natural body of water or man made? Is this a native species or invasive? Many important species of wildlife have been "persecuted" based on appearance or the fact that they compete with other species humans favor. At the same time invasive species are a serious problem. If this a natural body of water with a sudden shift in population there is something wrong. Either way, short of draining the lake which has it's own consequences, the carp are likely there to stay. But it was good to see those who spoke up and told the OP not to release them in neighboring waters. It's good to see people take an interest in our waters.

Yeah I guess I just find it frustrating with many of the myths that got posted the first time around. I do agree that this is one of the few ways people will actually take the few minutes to read over some of the facts and educate themselves. It is nice to meet others who have respect for a fish that is here to stay though. I do enjoy being the only person out fishing for fish that average size is above 2'
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Old 03-31-2012, 05:53 PM
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Sichuan Crispy-Fried Carp

Slice the carp to the backbone every 1/4 inch or so, which cuts the little bones and opens them up to the hot oil. It’s the hot oil that softens the bones to the point where you can barely notice them. This technique works with pike and shad, too.

2 whole (but scaled and gutted) carp or other pan-sized fish

MARINADE

3 chopped green onions
A 1-inch piece of finely chopped, peeled ginger
2 tablespoons Chinese cooking wine (or Japanese Mirin)
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 chopped hot chile
1 teaspoon Szechuan peppercorns (optional)

VEGGIES

A 3-inch piece of peeled ginger
1/2 medium onion
5 cloves garlic
1/2 finely chopped Habanero chile, or 1-2 Thai chiles or 1 Serrano

SAUCE

5 tablespoons water
5 tablespoons tomato sauce or ketchup
3 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons Chinese cooking wine (or Japanese Mirin)
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons corn starch

GARNISH

2 tablespoons finely chopped cilantro
2 finely chopped green onions or chives
2-4 cups peanut or vegetable oil
1 cup rice, potato or regular flour for dredging



Cut off the fins of each fish with kitchen shears or scissors. Remove the gills of the fish if they are still attached by cutting them out with the kitchen shears. Make vertical slices along each side of the fish evenly spaced along its length, about 1/4 inch apart from each other.

Rinse the fish under cold water and pat dry.

Marinate the fish. Put the 3 chopped green onions, chile, the 1-inch piece of finely chopped ginger, the Chinese cooking wine, soy sauce and the black pepper into a blender and buzz to combine. Pour the mixture into a glass or plastic container, or a Ziploc bag. (Add the Szechuan peppercorns now if you use them. Place the fish in the container and refrigerate for 3 hours, make sure the marinade surrounds the fish.

Take it out of the fridge and let it get to room temperature when you are getting ready to cook it.

Julienne the 3-inch piece of ginger. Keep in mind 3 inches is a guideline, so the ginger can be a bit larger or smaller. Cut the ginger into a rectangle, then slice it into thin rectangles about 1/8 inch thick. Then slice these thin rectangles into very thin strips — as thin as you can make them.

Slice the 1/2 onion into very thin half-moons.
Slice the garlic cloves as thinly as you can along the long side of the clove to make long pieces.

Pour the oil into a wok and turn the heat on to medium-high. If you do not have a wok, use the largest, deepest skillet you have. A wok works better because its shape prevents the tail fin from burning to charcoal.

Meanwhile, make the sauce. Mix the tomato sauce — I use pureed tomatoes — sugar, soy sauce, Chinese cooking wine, water and corn starch and stir vigorously to combine. Set it aside.

Get the oil up to 300-325 degrees. If you do not have a thermometer (you should buy one!) the oil is ready when a drop of flour tossed into the oil sizzles immediately.

Fry the fish. Remove the carp from the marinade and dredge in flour. Shake off excess, and when the oil is at hot, slip the fish one at a time into the oil. You are probably going to have to cook one fish at time. If so, turn the oven on to “warm.”

Fry the fish for at least 5 minutes per side. You want it to be golden brown. With 325-degree oil, I will fry a 1-pound fish for 8 minutes on the first side, 5 minutes on the other side. Larger fish need more time.

When the first fish is done, remove it to a plate and put the plate in the warm oven. Fry the second fish the same way as the first.

Finish the dish. When the fish are done, ladle out all but about 1/4 cup of oil. Toss in the slivered ginger, the onion, the chiles and the slivered garlic and stir-fry over high heat for 2-3 minutes.

Add the sweet-and-sour sauce and stir well to combine. Bring this to a rapid boil and stir well for 2-3 minutes.

To serve, pour some sauce on a plate, place the fish on top of it and garnish with the finely chopped chives and cilantro. This dish goes best with simple steamed white rice.
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Old 03-31-2012, 06:02 PM
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My cookbook is a little unhandy to get to right now but the first recipe is close to what I do and the second is about the same to the best of my knowledge that Grandma used to do but she did it to any fish not just carp.

Quote:
Pickled Carp
Prep: 10 min, Cook: 35 min, plus refrigeration time.

1/2 cup white wine vinegar
1/3 cup water
1 Tbs. plus 1 tsp. tamari soy sauce
1-1/4 bay leaves
4 peppercorns
3/4 whole clove
2-3/4 whole allspice
1/4 tsp. celery seed
1/8 tsp. mustard seed
3/4 small dried hot chili pepper
1-1/4 onions, sliced
2 lbs. freshwater carp, cut into steaks

Place all ingredients, except carp, in a large pot over medium high heat. Boil 10 minutes. Add fish steaks and reduce heat immediately to low. Simmer 25 minutes. Remove from heat and let fish cool in the broth. Transfer fish to a glass container. Strain the liquid and pour over the fish. Refrigerate at least 24 hours before serving. Serve chilled.

http://www.mealsforyou.com/cgi-bin/recipe?id.2446
Quote:
Pickled Carp or Buffalo

Be brave! Give it a try!

Cut fish into 1/2 or 3/4 inch cubes. Soak the fish in a brine solution of one gallon white vinegar and one cup of canning salt for 10 days in the refrigerator. Stir once daily. Then thoroughly rinse the fish in cold water and drain well. Pack the fish into pint jars alternating layers of fish and sliced onion rings. Add one teaspoon of pickling spice to each jar and cover with a solution made of one cup white vinegar and one cup of sugar. Dont cook it! Store in the refrigerator for 10 days. Then enjoy!

http://www.illinoisbowfishing.net/Recipes.html
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Old 03-31-2012, 06:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Grump View Post
My cookbook is a little unhandy to get to right now but the first recipe is close to what I do and the second is about the same to the best of my knowledge that Grandma used to do but she did it to any fish not just carp.
Thanks for posting the recipes up. The first one looks really good and I plan getting into some pretty big numbers as pre-spawn is almost here already.

I am hoping to get enough to be able to do some canning as well. Fingers crossed for my first attempt
Old 03-31-2012, 09:10 PM
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Old 04-04-2012, 12:15 PM
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They're spawning. If you ever wanted to try bowfishing now would be the time.
Old 04-05-2012, 04:53 AM
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They have not started to spawn in my area yet (southern MN). The bass are starting to get pretty active though. The water temps are just about right for the spawn though. We had a unusual early spring and some warm temps. Chances are there is less then a month till the spawn kicks in.

I have been studying a large female for about a month now and she is favoring around 6' of water in the sun. I caught her twice on a hook but I think she has grown wise to my rig though as I have not gotten a pick up in a few days. I weighed her at 11 lbs the first week and 24", 3 weeks later almost 15 lbs and 26". The only reason I know it is the same fish is she got a pretty nasty gash in her head and it left a distinct scar.

I just ordered a bunch of new bait from a place called scorpion tackle. I am however pretty bummed on the 6+ days I have been waiting for my gear or any other sort of thanks for dropping 150$... Anyways I am planning on trying out a hair rig with different combos of boiles. I will post up some more pics and info when I have enough to make a decent post.

I am noticing that the Common carp seem to be ignoring kernals of corn and favoring basking in the sun for the past 2 weeks. The larger of the groups seem to be crusining a small stretch of water and are sticking to around 1' - 2'.

Hopefully this info helps out a few. Although most who care are in Europe and seem to be AFK for some time lol. In a few weeks I plan on going down to Iowa with a friend to do some research on the asian carp. I am bringing my bow and a gill net on the trip.

I do want to learn more about the asian carp this year as I am sure if things do go south I am sure that fish will be in every body of water out there. The plan is to catch as many as we can but I think most will be destined for my willow tree. I do plan on using as much as I am able to for food and some canning.

Also I set up a few 25 gallon garbage cans to help clean out some of the catfish/carp I plan on catching. I keep 2 below my deck with the fish and 1 on top. I plan on using the lower cans to supply my gardens and the the top can to refill the lowers. My idea is carp/cat feces will be pretty good fertilizer with the de-chlorinated water. Our water seems to be really high in chlorine. A few years ago I bought a pretty nice pool and I had a few catfish in there and after a few days that water got pretty gross. I actually ran some water from the tap for a few hours and the weeds around that pool grew faster then anything else in my yard. The fish did not like the chlorine water at all though. I think the garbage can system I have will work pretty well. The lower buckets are in the shade 90% of the day and I have plenty airaetors for the cans.
Old 04-05-2012, 03:50 PM
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Carp is a polish christmas dinner tradition. Very tasty with some perogies and borscht
Old 04-07-2012, 01:34 AM
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Yea eat them, you may wish for one to hit your hook one day. They are spawning right now here, if I get one, I will eat it. They actually do not taste that bad. The whole reason they got a bad reputation was because of all those bones they have, they are harder to clean. There is nothing wrong with the taste, and WTH, catch one decent Carp and you can feed the whole crew.
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