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Old 11-20-2011, 04:02 PM
Flinter Flinter is offline
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They make sleeping bags that are rated to 20 degrees and weigh 2 lbs.

I wouldn't bother with anything else. It's almost sure to have more weight and bulk.
Old 11-20-2011, 04:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Optimist View Post
Sleeping bags are a bit bulky for some of our tastes, Shellback Bill. The use of a bedroll is generally due to wantiing to keep the package smaller.... Some of the newer bags will stuff down to a very small package, though, and really make the old bedroll a bit primitive for a lot of tastes.
I can definitely see the utility of the canvas and blanket bedroll in the warmer months.

My old bones would require at least a good ground pad under it.

How many wool blankets it would take to be warm in 20 degree weather?
Old 11-20-2011, 04:14 PM
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I have a goretex rain suit as a layer to sleep in..

in addition, i keep a 6x8' tarp and 72x80" moving blanket..With the above, i am good to go in all but the most extreme conditions...not likely in Charlotte....

we used a poncho and liner back in the day, slept ok too.....
Old 11-20-2011, 04:52 PM
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Optimist Optimist is offline
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....How many wool blankets it would take to be warm in 20 degree weather?...
Three wool blankets and a BIIIIG dog.....
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Old 11-20-2011, 06:29 PM
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SavageSun 4x4 SavageSun 4x4 is offline
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Asking this of whoever.....

What's wrong with a plain ole sleeping bag and a light weight ground pad for a "bedroll"?
Nothing BUT they are two different things for two different purposes...
Old 11-20-2011, 07:21 PM
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I currently use a "heavy-duty" Myler "space blanket", or really, pcs of two of such things, which I cut into a mummy configuration and sewed/glued velcro all around, with a separate hood. I also use a silk bag liner. With Themax Expedition Weight longjohns, and Goretex cammies, I sleep fine down to +20F, when in the hammock and the 2-poncho 'tent" (made by attaching the ponchos to each other and tossing them over a suspended cord). If it's colder, I heat stones outside the tent, bring them inside and bury them under 2" or so of dirt. Then they radiate heat up under me for hours.

The mylar won't leak stuffing or get wet, there are no zippers to jam or break. The bag can be opened up into a flat blanket at a minute's notice. It all packs up very compactly, is quite lw and costs very little, actually. The mylar can be used for other things, can be "worn" during the day as you walk, or as you sit around, unlike most sleeping bags. I toss and turn too much for blankets to stay on me, often can 't go back to sleep once I am so awakened, either. So normal blankets suck for my use.
Old 11-20-2011, 11:32 PM
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WARNING: The stone idea is great as long as you are absolutely sure it isnt Limestone or something similar....or else BOOM. I felt it was important to interject that warning. Heating a porous rock like limestone essentially creates a rock bomb. It will explode as the moisture tries to escape.
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Old 11-21-2011, 12:21 AM
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WARNING: The stone idea is great as long as you are absolutely sure it isnt Limestone or something similar....or else BOOM. I felt it was important to interject that warning. Heating a porous rock like limestone essentially creates a rock bomb. It will explode as the moisture tries to escape.
The same is true for river rock. So don't heat that you found in or close to the water.
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Old 01-05-2013, 11:36 PM
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I can get a large canvas drop cloth from the hardware store I work at for really cheap. Would that be a good shell to start building my bedroll?
Old 01-06-2013, 08:18 AM
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I can get a large canvas drop cloth from the hardware store I work at for really cheap. Would that be a good shell to start building my bedroll?
If you can find a place outside to stretch it out so it blows in the wind, you can paint it with linseed oil, let it dry and you will have a waterproof cover.

2 words of caution....it takes a long time to dry, and it is very flammable. However, I have used a setup like that for a long time.
Old 01-06-2013, 12:34 PM
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There's some good discussion about lighter sleeping systems here: http://www.survivalistboards.com/sho...d.php?t=278177

The short answer is, don't cheap out on your insulation. Take more than what you think you'll need, and be sure to pack some extra down socks and a decent pad.
Old 01-06-2013, 12:34 PM
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Yeah I would like to do linseed oil but would probably end up spraying it with waterproofing spray. I think it's kiwi that makes it.
Old 01-06-2013, 02:49 PM
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Wool blanket, foam pad and a treated canvas wrap. Stays strapped on my Harley all the time. Obviously don't use it in the winter, but have spent many a damp, cold night wrapped comfortably in it.

Lots of options, but TRY OUT what you decide on, even if it's just in the backyard.
Old 01-06-2013, 06:36 PM
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http://www.cabelas.com/product/Eurek...tyId%3D1168711


http://www.cabelas.com/product/Eurek...tyId%3D1168711
Old 01-09-2013, 10:53 PM
PapaWhiskyBravo PapaWhiskyBravo is offline
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My ultralight 'swag'.

Integral designs silshelter bugliner.
Mountain designs ultra 300 sleeping bag.
Exped synmat 7LW inflatable sleeping mat.

Weight 2.54kg (6lbs)


Shown next to closed cell mat for size comparison.


The mat isnt inflated in this pic. It has an in built pump and gets to about 3 inchs thick when inflated.

The bug net can be set up like a tent with a hiking pole or stick, but 90% of the time i just sleep in it like this. The mat is super comfy and the down sleeping bag has dealt with Australian conditions perfectly.
Old 01-10-2013, 10:25 PM
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Old Army saying: "Travel light, freeze at night."
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Old 01-11-2013, 11:15 AM
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Quote:
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Old Army saying: "Travel light, freeze at night."
For inexperienced people, maybe. The Army way of carrying heavy crap destroyed my knees. I have a 0 degree sleeping bag that weighs 1.5lbs, so that saying isn't true.

The Army lost a great soldier because the gear was too heavy. I had a 91 average in medic school, barely studied. I went to Iraq, weighed 145, and was carrying about 85lbs of gear all day. The max you are supposed to carry is 20% of your body weight. Instead of spending billions on stealth bombers and whiz bang technology, they need to find a way to severely lighten the combat load. I had a doctor tell me they lose 15% of their people because of heavy gear. I met some retired infantry, and they had bad backs, knees, and every other problem you could think of.
Old 01-11-2013, 03:58 PM
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Any good ideas other than linseed oil for waterproofing?
Has anyone used starch or anything?
Old 01-12-2013, 12:48 AM
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As former Infantry i can appreciate lighter sleeping systems. I used to use the poncho, poncho liner and a 1" thermarest pad. wrap the liner and poncho around the pad and sleep like a baby. I used a black watch cap also. I woke up several mornings with frost on me and I slept great. It rolls up nice and compact and isnt real heavy. I still take that camping today.
Old 01-12-2013, 01:40 AM
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if the temps are above 35-40, get a poncho liner and tie it to the reflective side of one of the heavier space blankets. fold it in half for your bag and lay it on your sleeping pad. air it out good in the morning then roll it all up together. fast, light, and cheap.
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