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Old 04-18-2010, 10:35 PM
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Default Svt 40



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A WWII vet friend of mine has an SVT 40 that he got from a buddy of his. He says it was brought back from another vet. Aparently it was a German capture, somehow made it over to the west front and was liberated by the said vet. Now, I don't know too much about the SVT's, which is why I'm posting here. This particular rifle seemed interesting. It's in awesome shape. My friend explained to me that (based on his research) it used to be a fully automatic modle, but was sent back to be converted to a semiautomatic while still in Russian hands. He pointed out an "A" on the buttstock, and something about the safety lever and a certain position it could be put in. The bolt was a plum-ish color, which I understand would be consistent with the rifle being sent back to the factory.

I was wondering if anyone could give me more information on the rifle. If all this sounds correct. (If not It's more likely that I have my info jacked up than that my friend gave me bad info.) I am very interested in Russian weapons, and this being one I don't know too much about, I want to learn more.

He's going to bring it to the range next time so I can shoot it. There's no better history than history you can destory things with.
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Old 04-18-2010, 10:56 PM
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I have never heard of an automatic SVT-40, but that would be cool. I think that one is wrong (But im no SVT expert, im just saying i have never heard of one)

The SVT-40 was the daddy of the SKS.

Chambered in 7.62x54r, i believe.

Semi automatic, gas operated, and i think it had a 10 round 'detatchable' box mag, but was mainly used with stripper clips? I think the mag was like on the Enfield's, you could reload by taking out the mag and popping a new one in, but it was just faster to use stripper clips.

I saw a show on military channel saying it wasnt widely used because of its reliability issues with the 7.62x54r (RIMMED) cartridge, The issues were with the RIMS on the shells catching on each other, not with the weapon itself.

I think i have heard it was just an attempt to keep up with the Garand.

But it should be an AMAZING piece to work with, have fun!
Old 04-18-2010, 11:07 PM
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The AVT-40 is automatic. I can't comment on anything else though since I don't know much about them. I do however want one, but on gunbroker they are ~600 bucks.
Old 04-18-2010, 11:15 PM
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The AVT-40 was the full auto SVT-40. My veteran friend I think meant that it was a converted AVT-40 to semi-auto. When I say I don't know much about the SVT-40, I'm more referring to details... as in did the Ruskies actually do that? Would they have done that during the war? I know the simple stuff such as what cartridge it's chambered for and the capacity of the magazine.

The PTRS-41 was actually the "daddy" of the SKS-45.

And the reliabilty issues i've read were due to the fact that for the most part the Russians didn't maintain them properly. The Germans and Fin's loved them

I appreciate your help, but I should have made my question more specific. Can anyone confirm my information, tell me more about certain aspects that would make a rifle more of a collectors item than others. That kind of stuff.
Old 04-19-2010, 01:42 AM
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Go to surplusrifles.com should be lot's of good info there on it. I think that's the site name if not just google it.
Old 04-19-2010, 02:40 PM
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I have owned and shot a SVT-40 a couple of decades. One of the most reliable and accurate semi-autos around. I have also reloaded the 7.62x54R cartridge for as long as I have had the rifle. Ammo was not very available when I got the gun and I have found and perfer handloads over mil-surp. I have even shot the SVT-40 in a couple of 1000 Meter Military service rifle competitions and placed on one ocassion using it.
The guns have a great history and it was independently developed and not to compete or copy any other firearm though the SAFN has some simularities nor was it developed to match the M1 Garand. The SVT-40 was a highly prized capture for both the Germans and Finns and both had their own stock numbers with thier quartermaster corps and were repaired and rearsenaled by both to be issued to selected troops. While the average line soviet soldier may not have taken care of a SVT-40 thus the unwaranted myth of being unreliable Soviet marines at Leningrad used thier SVT-40 to devistating effect on finnish and elite german troops as did soviet snipers. The other factor in the myth is cold war propaganda like we used in WW2 on the weakness of the Arisaka rifle action. In reality one of the strongest bolts actions ever.
Some AVT-40 were full auto but like the M-14 found to be virturally unusable in full auto mode. They were issued usually with a 20 round magazine. Many were converted back to semi-auto.
The SVT-40 is one of the lightest full power military service rifles of WW2 and weighs less than a standard issue AK-47. It has an adjustable gas valve and I can make mine very light on the recoil.
Originally I got it because I could not afford a more modern main battle rifle semi-auto at the time and since I reloaded I adjusted to cover the ammo issue. Now I could easily sell for a lot more than I paid for it.
Given my experiences with it over time I have aquired a couple of items to make it a viable part of my family groups arsenal; A B-Square scope mount and a short tube 3x9 scope that allows stripper clip reloading, some spare functioning 10 round magazines and a recoil pad to extend the stock for my tastes. I also have the original sling and bayonet. The bayonet is valued at twice what I paid for the rifle.
Personally at range I would feel I had the advantage against a ballistic chestwigger armed with a SOCOM II.
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Old 04-19-2010, 08:10 PM
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This is a very sought after rifle. If it's an AVT it is rare to see. So are the SVT's SVT saw service as a sniper rifle for some time. If I could find one for a good price I would snatch it up quick.
Old 04-22-2010, 02:17 AM
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Not all SVT-40 and 38's only the 6 line Flash suppressor ones with grooves on the lower backof the reciever were used as a sniper or marksman weapon. The later model more open slot flash suppressor models were used as a regular main battle rifle but were generally issued to sargents or selected trained troops. German or Finnish troops were known to discard thier rifles and pick up a SVT-40 if they encountered one and fight with it.
Old 04-22-2010, 10:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forrestdweller View Post
Not all SVT-40 and 38's only the 6 line Flash suppressor ones with grooves on the lower backof the reciever were used as a sniper or marksman weapon. The later model more open slot flash suppressor models were used as a regular main battle rifle but were generally issued to sargents or selected trained troops. German or Finnish troops were known to discard thier rifles and pick up a SVT-40 if they encountered one and fight with it.
Yes, that is very true. But don't forget during WWII german forces also snatched up PPsh41 and other Soviet weapons and used them. Seeing as the Kar98 was the service issue for most troops then.


The svt40 is a great rifle. Semi auto 7.62x54R need I say more?
Old 04-22-2010, 09:01 PM
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Default Re: Svt 40

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Originally Posted by MH12194 View Post
The svt40 is a great rifle. Semi auto 7.62x54R need I say more?
M1 Garand, semi auto 7.62x63. Need i say more???
Old 04-23-2010, 04:19 AM
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Default Re: Svt 40

One interesting feature of the SVT-40 is it has a semi-fluted chamber. The neck and shoulder areas are fluted to insure reliable extraction of the spent cartridge case. Soviet ammo especially during WW2 could and was a variable quality item. The SVT-40's adjustable gas valve was another concession to ammo quality though had another use is being opened out so a sniper could manually slide the bolt and not give away her or his position.
Now I dearly love and would probably grab my M1 Garand before any other to engage the muntant hordes but the SVT-40 has a couple of advantages over the M1.
It has a ten round vs eight magazine.
The SVT-40 is stripper clip and single round reloadable.
The SVT-40 has a detachable magazine.
The SVT-40 is nearly 2 pounds lighter.
The mounting of a scope is center line capable on a SVT-40.
One other myth about the SVT-40 and the Mosin-Nagant is the jamming of the rimmed 7.62x54R cartrudge. This was addressed by both in the use of an interupter device in both magazine feeds.
I have never encountered a jam because of rim overlap in either a SVT-40 or Mosin-Nagant.
Old 04-23-2010, 05:06 AM
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Default Re: Svt 40

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Originally Posted by forrestdweller View Post
I have owned and shot a SVT-40 a couple of decades. One of the most reliable and accurate semi-autos around.
Great info, forrestdweller, but some questions:
-Weren't there complaints about the SVT-40 sending fliers to left and right of center?
- The one I saw at the shop seemed very long and ungainly. Are you of small, medium, or large build and how does the weapon handle with you, both for firing and moving about?
Old 04-26-2010, 04:53 AM
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Default Re: Svt 40

Not my experience. Though there were some reported problems because soviet especially wartime production ammo was not consistant in quality.
The markspersons and sniper were issued special grade ammo but supply problems of distribution they did not always recieve this ammo. The adjustable gas vaulve and semi fluted chamber were concessions to the ammo qualities. I started out handloading and have rarely used anything but in my SVT-40 with the exception of a few boxes of Norma a very high quality commercial ammo.
I added a recoil pad to lengthen the stock to my taste not because of the recoil. The removable modification gives mine a better balance to me.
Yes! it is a long gun but because of the light weight I find it rather balanced.
It would not make a good room broom for sure.
My build is slightly taller than average and with the pad extension and back of reciever scope mounted it is rather well balanced. I would not say it would be great for running in thick woods with but it is over a pound lighter than a standard issue AK-47. Used as a defensive main battle rifle or as one of its historic uses a sniper gun. It will more than hold its own. Given its effective use by soviet snipers it must not have been to ungainly most soviet troopers were shorter than us especially the female ones all soviet snipers used either the lenghty Mosin-Nagant 91 or SVT-40 as did the Finn's. The historic record fairly well despells the ungainly and unbalanced concerns and consider the conditions and terrain they carried thier weapons through.
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