Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > Survival & Preparedness Forum > Wilderness Survival, Hiking and Camping Forum
Articles Chat Room Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files



Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-06-2010, 02:38 PM
GeorgiaOutdoorsman's Avatar
GeorgiaOutdoorsman GeorgiaOutdoorsman is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Gods Promised Land: Dixie
Posts: 58
Thanks: 60
Thanked 50 Times in 25 Posts
Default Allergic Reaction In The Woods



Advertise Here

If this is the wrong page please let me know how to move it to another section or maybe someone would move it for me but I was watching the television today and saw the use of an epi-pen when someone had an allergic reaction and got to thinking about what would happen in the woods if someone got into that situation. I personaly have asthma and make sure to have an inhaler on me incase I need to use it but I was wondering if anyone had any remedies for someone who had an allergic reaction in the woods and had no epi-pen to use in an emergency. I know my knowledge of plants and first aid needs to be refreshed but I was hoping someone could help me out a little quicker here. Are there any medicinal plants that would work? I looked in the plant section and saw that it wasn't checked as much as this one so I decided to post it here. And if this has already been addressed if someone could direct me to the right section I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks again.
Old 04-06-2010, 02:50 PM
vicdotcom's Avatar
vicdotcom vicdotcom is online now
Maximus
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 11,886
Thanks: 6,732
Thanked 14,081 Times in 6,233 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgiaOutdoorsman View Post
If this is the wrong page please let me know how to move it to another section or maybe someone would move it for me but I was watching the television today and saw the use of an epi-pen when someone had an allergic reaction and got to thinking about what would happen in the woods if someone got into that situation. I personaly have asthma and make sure to have an inhaler on me incase I need to use it but I was wondering if anyone had any remedies for someone who had an allergic reaction in the woods and had no epi-pen to use in an emergency. I know my knowledge of plants and first aid needs to be refreshed but I was hoping someone could help me out a little quicker here. Are there any medicinal plants that would work? I looked in the plant section and saw that it wasn't checked as much as this one so I decided to post it here. And if this has already been addressed if someone could direct me to the right section I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks again.
A few things. Epipen is epinephrine. That is an adrenaline that helps the body through a severe allergic reaction. The main purpose is to open up the airways to prevent your throat from swelling shut and suffocating you. That is purpose number 1. It works fast.

So in order to get something into your body that works just as fast, you will have to inject it or breathe it in. Epinephrine inhalers may do the trick also but that is mainly for asthma (allergic reaction in the lungs).

If you are having a slow allergic reaction. I mean slow to where you feel the symptoms coming on and not in danger of death, you can take some benadryl.

Severe allergic reactions is where the epipen works best. People who are deathly allergic to bee stings, peanuts, or other foods where breathing can be blocked within minutes. If you are this allergic to something, you need an epi-pen. No way you are going to wander enough to find the herbs you need. Keep calm and keep breathing would be some other things. Watch out for anaphylactic shock http://firstaid.about.com/od/allergi...aphylactic.htm

But if you don't have an epipen, carry some benadryl. Won't serve the same purposes, but better than nothing. Crush it up finely and drink it with water to get it into your system faster. There are a list of some marginaly effective natural anti-histamine plants, but it isn't worth it to look for these. Especially if your climate doesn't support it. For example, MaHuang is a chinese plant that has natural epinephrine but you get to china much? Carry some benadryl instead.
The Following User Says Thank You to vicdotcom For This Useful Post:
Old 04-06-2010, 02:55 PM
WyomingMedic's Avatar
WyomingMedic WyomingMedic is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Central Wyoming
Posts: 43
Thanks: 0
Thanked 142 Times in 21 Posts
Default

This is also a serious concern of mine and I have taken steps to "fix" it. First of all, I know of no plants that will actually help you once an allergic reaction starts. Typically the patient enters a state where their airway closes off and they become unconscious.

The best bet is to know what you are allergic to. If you can identify a significant allergen, talk to your doctor about getting an EPI pen. They are cheap and can be carried easily. As a paramedic, I have given many folks their EPI pen shots. It is a spring loaded system where a needle at near an inch long stabs into their thigh and delivers Epinephrine. Typically .3 MG. This is a life saving measure and not without its risks, but it sure beats dying.

The other thing that is super helpful is Benadry. Plain, over the counter 25 MG pills work great. This is a histamine blocker and really helps stop (or slow down) the allergic reaction and lower the upper end. These can be bought at any store.

That is what I recommend. That is exactly what a paramedic carries in the ambulance and it gives you the best shot at survival. Just go talk to your doc and see what they say.

Stay safe,

WM
The Following User Says Thank You to WyomingMedic For This Useful Post:
Old 04-06-2010, 07:53 PM
methemom's Avatar
methemom methemom is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: northern mi
Posts: 3,593
Thanks: 5,569
Thanked 3,453 Times in 1,670 Posts
Default

you can get a liquid version of benadryl also, and that would get into your system even quicker... My dr told me I could also take allegra or claratin along with the benadryl if I needed extra control of my allergies. I take allegra or claratin every day from late April to October after a few hard frosts. I never go anywhere without it, especially far into the woods, etc... I take it then just as a precaution, and carry that liquid benadryl.
Only had one major allergy attack while camping (asthma) and the benadryl probably saved my life. We were a long way from an emergency room!
Old 04-07-2010, 01:40 PM
riverrat's Avatar
riverrat riverrat is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: minnesota
Posts: 2,118
Thanks: 279
Thanked 1,183 Times in 606 Posts
Default

My neighbors wife had a reaction to a bee sting and started experiencing swelling in the throat. Benadryl did the trick until the ambulance arrived.
Old 04-07-2010, 01:54 PM
bluewolf's Avatar
bluewolf bluewolf is offline
obstinate Bastard
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 223
Thanks: 637
Thanked 174 Times in 102 Posts
Default

I heard and have always used caffienne, a good strong cup of coffee, as it is good to take if your throat is closing up.It helps to temporarily alleviate the symptoms.
I always carry a epipen on me, in case my son has a reaction, but they ain't cheap, I pay $100.00 CDN per pen,which needs to be changed once per year, and I need 2.
Old 04-07-2010, 03:50 PM
gwopy gwopy is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 310
Thanks: 0
Thanked 127 Times in 75 Posts
Default

Benadryl or any antihistamine will help since it will help to block to the immune response, but the only way to be safe is to know your allergies and have the medicines that you need WITH YOU AT ALL TIMES!

Severe anaphylaxis can quickly and completely eliminate the A & B from your ABCs. I suppose you could rig up a breathing tube (maybe from a hollow tent pole) or perform a tracheotomy, but I wouldn't want to be doing that out in the woods.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluewolf View Post
I heard and have always used caffienne, a good strong cup of coffee, as it is good to take if your throat is closing up.It helps to temporarily alleviate the symptoms.
Dude, that sounds a little suspicious. It does work as a vasoconstrictor, but I'd be cautious about relying on coffee in a medical emergency.
Old 04-07-2010, 05:59 PM
bluewolf's Avatar
bluewolf bluewolf is offline
obstinate Bastard
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 223
Thanks: 637
Thanked 174 Times in 102 Posts
Default

I didn't say to rely on it, If you are out there and have no meds(your an idiot) then you can use a strong caffienne drink to open up the airways.
The Following User Says Thank You to bluewolf For This Useful Post:
Old 04-07-2010, 07:13 PM
methemom's Avatar
methemom methemom is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: northern mi
Posts: 3,593
Thanks: 5,569
Thanked 3,453 Times in 1,670 Posts
Default

and one could concievably use coffee or caffeine drinks like colas to help absorbtion of meds once taken, too. I think that may be why they used to put caffeine in dristan and excedrin, come to think of it.
Old 04-08-2010, 01:17 AM
TMcArthur's Avatar
TMcArthur TMcArthur is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: SoCal
Posts: 4,983
Thanks: 1,089
Thanked 5,659 Times in 2,374 Posts
Default

Epi pens inject epinephrine (aka Adrenalin) which acts as a stimulant. It increases blood pressure and expands the airways. It doesn't stop the allergic reaction but rather opposes its most lethal effects, loss of blood pressure (shock) and bronchial constriction. Pseudoephedrine is a common OTC decongestant that does something similar, only to a far lesser degree. High doses of caffeine would do the same. However there is no good substitute for an epi-pen and don't think you can do without if you are prone to strong allergic reactions. (I suppose you could snort some meth....)

For severe allergic reaction you also want an antihistamine, Benedryl liquid (aka Diphenhydramine) or the generic equivalent. The liquid gets absorbed more quickly. Antihistamines act directly on the allergic reaction rather than the symptoms. In an allergic reaction, your histamine production goes wild. Antihistamines prevent the histamines from binding to the histamine receptor.

Large doses (2000 mg.) of vitamin C are known to inhibit the production of histamines. This should also reduce the effects of anaphylactic shock.

In the event of anaphylactic shock, ideally you've have an IV administering fluids. In the field you are likely to be stuck guzzling water as long as you are able to do so.

Antihistamines and decongestants are commonly combined. Benedryl tends to make you drowsy and is sometime used as a sleep aid. Pseudoephedrine wakes most people up, much like strong coffee. Actifed is an antihistamine combined with pseudoephedrine.

Again there ain't no substitute for an epi-pen if you need one. Just stopgap measures to keep you alive a bit longer till you get medical attention.
Old 04-08-2010, 01:27 AM
TMcArthur's Avatar
TMcArthur TMcArthur is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: SoCal
Posts: 4,983
Thanks: 1,089
Thanked 5,659 Times in 2,374 Posts
Default

Actually the reason they put caffeine in headache meds is that it opens up the blood vessels and this can help in migraines. Also, the most important cause of weekend headaches is that people drink coffee at work all week and get addicted. Then on the weekend they don't and go thru withdrawal.
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
allergies, first aid



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright Kevin Felts 2006 - 2012,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net